Intuit's (NASDAQ:INTU) five-year total shareholder returns outpace the underlying earnings growth

By
Simply Wall St
Published
February 20, 2022
NasdaqGS:INTU
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Some Intuit Inc. (NASDAQ:INTU) shareholders are probably rather concerned to see the share price fall 30% over the last three months. But that scarcely detracts from the really solid long term returns generated by the company over five years. We think most investors would be happy with the 276% return, over that period. So while it's never fun to see a share price fall, it's important to look at a longer time horizon. The more important question is whether the stock is too cheap or too expensive today.

Since the long term performance has been good but there's been a recent pullback of 10%, let's check if the fundamentals match the share price.

See our latest analysis for Intuit

To quote Buffett, 'Ships will sail around the world but the Flat Earth Society will flourish. There will continue to be wide discrepancies between price and value in the marketplace...' By comparing earnings per share (EPS) and share price changes over time, we can get a feel for how investor attitudes to a company have morphed over time.

During five years of share price growth, Intuit achieved compound earnings per share (EPS) growth of 19% per year. This EPS growth is slower than the share price growth of 30% per year, over the same period. This suggests that market participants hold the company in higher regard, these days. And that's hardly shocking given the track record of growth. This optimism is visible in its fairly high P/E ratio of 65.13.

The graphic below depicts how EPS has changed over time (unveil the exact values by clicking on the image).

earnings-per-share-growth
NasdaqGS:INTU Earnings Per Share Growth February 20th 2022

This free interactive report on Intuit's earnings, revenue and cash flow is a great place to start, if you want to investigate the stock further.

What About Dividends?

When looking at investment returns, it is important to consider the difference between total shareholder return (TSR) and share price return. Whereas the share price return only reflects the change in the share price, the TSR includes the value of dividends (assuming they were reinvested) and the benefit of any discounted capital raising or spin-off. So for companies that pay a generous dividend, the TSR is often a lot higher than the share price return. We note that for Intuit the TSR over the last 5 years was 291%, which is better than the share price return mentioned above. This is largely a result of its dividend payments!

A Different Perspective

We're pleased to report that Intuit shareholders have received a total shareholder return of 18% over one year. That's including the dividend. Having said that, the five-year TSR of 31% a year, is even better. Potential buyers might understandably feel they've missed the opportunity, but it's always possible business is still firing on all cylinders. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. To that end, you should be aware of the 3 warning signs we've spotted with Intuit .

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

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