Here's Why Aramark (NYSE:ARMK) Is Weighed Down By Its Debt Load

By
Simply Wall St
Published
April 11, 2022
NYSE:ARMK
Source: Shutterstock

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. Importantly, Aramark (NYSE:ARMK) does carry debt. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Aramark

What Is Aramark's Debt?

As you can see below, Aramark had US$7.90b of debt, at December 2021, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, it also had US$415.5m in cash, and so its net debt is US$7.49b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:ARMK Debt to Equity History April 11th 2022

How Healthy Is Aramark's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Aramark had liabilities of US$2.37b due within 12 months, and liabilities of US$9.30b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had US$415.5m in cash and US$1.90b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$9.36b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's market capitalization of US$8.97b, we think shareholders really should watch Aramark's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Aramark shareholders face the double whammy of a high net debt to EBITDA ratio (8.1), and fairly weak interest coverage, since EBIT is just 0.96 times the interest expense. This means we'd consider it to have a heavy debt load. However, the silver lining was that Aramark achieved a positive EBIT of US$375m in the last twelve months, an improvement on the prior year's loss. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Aramark can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So it's worth checking how much of the earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) is backed by free cash flow. During the last year, Aramark burned a lot of cash. While investors are no doubt expecting a reversal of that situation in due course, it clearly does mean its use of debt is more risky.

Our View

To be frank both Aramark's interest cover and its track record of converting EBIT to free cash flow make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. Having said that, its ability to grow its EBIT isn't such a worry. After considering the datapoints discussed, we think Aramark has too much debt. While some investors love that sort of risky play, it's certainly not our cup of tea. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example, we've discovered 2 warning signs for Aramark (1 is a bit concerning!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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