Is M Food (WSE:MFD) A Risky Investment?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
July 20, 2021
WSE:MFD
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We note that M Food S.A. (WSE:MFD) does have debt on its balance sheet. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for M Food

How Much Debt Does M Food Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of March 2021 M Food had zł34.0m of debt, an increase on zł24.9m, over one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of zł8.90m, its net debt is less, at about zł25.1m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
WSE:MFD Debt to Equity History July 21st 2021

How Strong Is M Food's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that M Food had liabilities of zł53.1m due within a year, and liabilities of zł1.16m falling due after that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of zł8.90m as well as receivables valued at zł36.5m due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by zł8.88m.

M Food has a market capitalization of zł28.2m, so it could very likely raise cash to ameliorate its balance sheet, if the need arose. However, it is still worthwhile taking a close look at its ability to pay off debt.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

M Food's net debt is 3.5 times its EBITDA, which is a significant but still reasonable amount of leverage. But its EBIT was about 16.0 times its interest expense, implying the company isn't really paying a high cost to maintain that level of debt. Even were the low cost to prove unsustainable, that is a good sign. Notably, M Food's EBIT launched higher than Elon Musk, gaining a whopping 496% on last year. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is M Food's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, M Food recorded free cash flow worth 70% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

The good news is that M Food's demonstrated ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. But truth be told we feel its net debt to EBITDA does undermine this impression a bit. Zooming out, M Food seems to use debt quite reasonably; and that gets the nod from us. While debt does bring risk, when used wisely it can also bring a higher return on equity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. These risks can be hard to spot. Every company has them, and we've spotted 2 warning signs for M Food you should know about.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.
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