These Return Metrics Don't Make Birman Wood & Hardware (TLV:BIRM) Look Too Strong

By
Simply Wall St
Published
August 30, 2021
TASE:BIRM
Source: Shutterstock

When it comes to investing, there are some useful financial metrics that can warn us when a business is potentially in trouble. A business that's potentially in decline often shows two trends, a return on capital employed (ROCE) that's declining, and a base of capital employed that's also declining. This indicates to us that the business is not only shrinking the size of its net assets, but its returns are falling as well. And from a first read, things don't look too good at Birman Wood & Hardware (TLV:BIRM), so let's see why.

Return On Capital Employed (ROCE): What is it?

For those that aren't sure what ROCE is, it measures the amount of pre-tax profits a company can generate from the capital employed in its business. Analysts use this formula to calculate it for Birman Wood & Hardware:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.15 = ₪22m ÷ (₪318m - ₪175m) (Based on the trailing twelve months to December 2020).

So, Birman Wood & Hardware has an ROCE of 15%. That's a relatively normal return on capital, and it's around the 19% generated by the Building industry.

Check out our latest analysis for Birman Wood & Hardware

roce
TASE:BIRM Return on Capital Employed August 31st 2021

While the past is not representative of the future, it can be helpful to know how a company has performed historically, which is why we have this chart above. If you'd like to look at how Birman Wood & Hardware has performed in the past in other metrics, you can view this free graph of past earnings, revenue and cash flow.

The Trend Of ROCE

In terms of Birman Wood & Hardware's historical ROCE movements, the trend doesn't inspire confidence. About five years ago, returns on capital were 19%, however they're now substantially lower than that as we saw above. And on the capital employed front, the business is utilizing roughly the same amount of capital as it was back then. Companies that exhibit these attributes tend to not be shrinking, but they can be mature and facing pressure on their margins from competition. If these trends continue, we wouldn't expect Birman Wood & Hardware to turn into a multi-bagger.

Another thing to note, Birman Wood & Hardware has a high ratio of current liabilities to total assets of 55%. This can bring about some risks because the company is basically operating with a rather large reliance on its suppliers or other sorts of short-term creditors. Ideally we'd like to see this reduce as that would mean fewer obligations bearing risks.

The Bottom Line

All in all, the lower returns from the same amount of capital employed aren't exactly signs of a compounding machine. However the stock has delivered a 90% return to shareholders over the last five years, so investors might be expecting the trends to turn around. Regardless, we don't feel too comfortable with the fundamentals so we'd be steering clear of this stock for now.

One more thing: We've identified 5 warning signs with Birman Wood & Hardware (at least 2 which are significant) , and understanding them would certainly be useful.

If you want to search for solid companies with great earnings, check out this free list of companies with good balance sheets and impressive returns on equity.

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