Is West China Cement (HKG:2233) A Risky Investment?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
May 13, 2022
SEHK:2233
Source: Shutterstock

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. We can see that West China Cement Limited (HKG:2233) does use debt in its business. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for West China Cement

What Is West China Cement's Net Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of December 2021, West China Cement had CN¥9.92b of debt, up from CN¥4.85b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. On the flip side, it has CN¥3.59b in cash leading to net debt of about CN¥6.33b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SEHK:2233 Debt to Equity History May 13th 2022

How Healthy Is West China Cement's Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that West China Cement had liabilities of CN¥7.73b due within 12 months and liabilities of CN¥7.12b due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of CN¥3.59b as well as receivables valued at CN¥3.32b due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling CN¥7.95b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's CN¥5.31b market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

West China Cement's net debt to EBITDA ratio of about 2.3 suggests only moderate use of debt. And its commanding EBIT of 22.7 times its interest expense, implies the debt load is as light as a peacock feather. Unfortunately, West China Cement saw its EBIT slide 3.5% in the last twelve months. If earnings continue on that decline then managing that debt will be difficult like delivering hot soup on a unicycle. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine West China Cement's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Over the last three years, West China Cement recorded negative free cash flow, in total. Debt is far more risky for companies with unreliable free cash flow, so shareholders should be hoping that the past expenditure will produce free cash flow in the future.

Our View

On the face of it, West China Cement's conversion of EBIT to free cash flow left us tentative about the stock, and its level of total liabilities was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. But on the bright side, its interest cover is a good sign, and makes us more optimistic. We're quite clear that we consider West China Cement to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example West China Cement has 2 warning signs (and 1 which can't be ignored) we think you should know about.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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