Here's Why Worldline (EPA:WLN) Can Manage Its Debt Responsibly

By
Simply Wall St
Published
April 17, 2022
ENXTPA:WLN
Source: Shutterstock

The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We note that Worldline SA (EPA:WLN) does have debt on its balance sheet. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Worldline

What Is Worldline's Net Debt?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that Worldline had debt of €4.25b at the end of December 2021, a reduction from €4.55b over a year. On the flip side, it has €1.14b in cash leading to net debt of about €3.12b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
ENXTPA:WLN Debt to Equity History April 17th 2022

How Strong Is Worldline's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Worldline had liabilities of €5.52b due within 12 months, and liabilities of €4.61b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had €1.14b in cash and €881.1m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by €8.11b.

This deficit is considerable relative to its very significant market capitalization of €9.88b, so it does suggest shareholders should keep an eye on Worldline's use of debt. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Worldline's net debt is 4.7 times its EBITDA, which is a significant but still reasonable amount of leverage. However, its interest coverage of 15.4 is very high, suggesting that the interest expense on the debt is currently quite low. Importantly, Worldline grew its EBIT by 50% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Worldline can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. During the last three years, Worldline generated free cash flow amounting to a very robust 93% of its EBIT, more than we'd expect. That puts it in a very strong position to pay down debt.

Our View

The good news is that Worldline's demonstrated ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. But we must concede we find its net debt to EBITDA has the opposite effect. All these things considered, it appears that Worldline can comfortably handle its current debt levels. On the plus side, this leverage can boost shareholder returns, but the potential downside is more risk of loss, so it's worth monitoring the balance sheet. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. To that end, you should be aware of the 2 warning signs we've spotted with Worldline .

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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