Is Essbio (SNSE:ESSBIO-C) Using Too Much Debt?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
May 29, 2021
SNSE:ESSBIO-C
Source: Shutterstock

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We can see that Essbio S.A. (SNSE:ESSBIO-C) does use debt in its business. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Essbio

How Much Debt Does Essbio Carry?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that at March 2021 Essbio had debt of CL$471.5b, up from CL$401.5b in one year. However, it also had CL$62.0b in cash, and so its net debt is CL$409.6b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SNSE:ESSBIO-C Debt to Equity History May 30th 2021

How Strong Is Essbio's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Essbio had liabilities of CL$67.2b due within 12 months, and liabilities of CL$484.2b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had CL$62.0b in cash and CL$40.4b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by CL$449.0b.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's market capitalization of CL$314.2b, we think shareholders really should watch Essbio's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

With a net debt to EBITDA ratio of 5.4, it's fair to say Essbio does have a significant amount of debt. But the good news is that it boasts fairly comforting interest cover of 4.1 times, suggesting it can responsibly service its obligations. Even more troubling is the fact that Essbio actually let its EBIT decrease by 2.8% over the last year. If it keeps going like that paying off its debt will be like running on a treadmill -- a lot of effort for not much advancement. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is Essbio's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So if you're keen to discover more about its earnings, it might be worth checking out this graph of its long term earnings trend.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Essbio recorded free cash flow worth 53% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

To be frank both Essbio's net debt to EBITDA and its track record of staying on top of its total liabilities make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But at least it's pretty decent at converting EBIT to free cash flow; that's encouraging. We should also note that Water Utilities industry companies like Essbio commonly do use debt without problems. Looking at the bigger picture, it seems clear to us that Essbio's use of debt is creating risks for the company. If everything goes well that may pay off but the downside of this debt is a greater risk of permanent losses. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. To that end, you should learn about the 3 warning signs we've spotted with Essbio (including 2 which are potentially serious) .

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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