Stock Analysis

Nucor (NYSE:NUE) Seems To Use Debt Rather Sparingly

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NYSE:NUE
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Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. Importantly, Nucor Corporation (NYSE:NUE) does carry debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Nucor

What Is Nucor's Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of July 2022, Nucor had US$7.35b of debt, up from US$5.56b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, it does have US$2.37b in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about US$4.99b.

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NYSE:NUE Debt to Equity History August 11th 2022

How Healthy Is Nucor's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Nucor had liabilities of US$5.36b due within a year, and liabilities of US$8.46b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had US$2.37b in cash and US$4.75b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$6.70b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Since publicly traded Nucor shares are worth a very impressive total of US$37.1b, it seems unlikely that this level of liabilities would be a major threat. Having said that, it's clear that we should continue to monitor its balance sheet, lest it change for the worse.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Nucor's net debt is only 0.37 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 66.9 times the size. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. Better yet, Nucor grew its EBIT by 190% last year, which is an impressive improvement. That boost will make it even easier to pay down debt going forward. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Nucor can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. During the last three years, Nucor produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 57% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

Happily, Nucor's impressive interest cover implies it has the upper hand on its debt. And that's just the beginning of the good news since its EBIT growth rate is also very heartening. Zooming out, Nucor seems to use debt quite reasonably; and that gets the nod from us. While debt does bring risk, when used wisely it can also bring a higher return on equity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. We've identified 2 warning signs with Nucor (at least 1 which is a bit unpleasant) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

What are the risks and opportunities for Nucor?

Nucor Corporation manufactures and sells steel and steel products.

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Rewards

  • Price-To-Earnings ratio (5.5x) is below the US market (15.1x)

  • Earnings have grown 42.6% per year over the past 5 years

Risks

  • Earnings are forecast to decline by an average of 56.7% per year for the next 3 years

  • Significant insider selling over the past 3 months

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