Landec (NASDAQ:LNDC) Has A Somewhat Strained Balance Sheet

By
Simply Wall St
Published
March 21, 2022
NasdaqGS:LNDC
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We note that Landec Corporation (NASDAQ:LNDC) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Landec

What Is Landec's Net Debt?

The chart below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that Landec had US$167.0m in debt in November 2021; about the same as the year before. And it doesn't have much cash, so its net debt is about the same.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NasdaqGS:LNDC Debt to Equity History March 21st 2022

How Strong Is Landec's Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Landec had liabilities of US$122.3m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$143.7m due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$1.09m as well as receivables valued at US$65.3m due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$199.6m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of US$307.2m. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Landec shareholders face the double whammy of a high net debt to EBITDA ratio (8.5), and fairly weak interest coverage, since EBIT is just 0.076 times the interest expense. This means we'd consider it to have a heavy debt load. However, the silver lining was that Landec achieved a positive EBIT of US$1.6m in the last twelve months, an improvement on the prior year's loss. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Landec's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So it's worth checking how much of the earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) is backed by free cash flow. During the last year, Landec burned a lot of cash. While investors are no doubt expecting a reversal of that situation in due course, it clearly does mean its use of debt is more risky.

Our View

On the face of it, Landec's interest cover left us tentative about the stock, and its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. But at least its EBIT growth rate is not so bad. We're quite clear that we consider Landec to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. So we're almost as wary of this stock as a hungry kitten is about falling into its owner's fish pond: once bitten, twice shy, as they say. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example - Landec has 1 warning sign we think you should be aware of.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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