Stock Analysis

These 4 Measures Indicate That Hyatt Hotels (NYSE:H) Is Using Debt Extensively

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NYSE:H
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David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. As with many other companies Hyatt Hotels Corporation (NYSE:H) makes use of debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Our analysis indicates that H is potentially undervalued!

How Much Debt Does Hyatt Hotels Carry?

As you can see below, at the end of June 2022, Hyatt Hotels had US$3.80b of debt, up from US$3.24b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$1.96b, its net debt is less, at about US$1.84b.

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NYSE:H Debt to Equity History October 25th 2022

How Healthy Is Hyatt Hotels' Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Hyatt Hotels had liabilities of US$2.41b falling due within a year, and liabilities of US$6.63b due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$1.96b and US$699.0m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total US$6.38b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit is considerable relative to its market capitalization of US$9.61b, so it does suggest shareholders should keep an eye on Hyatt Hotels' use of debt. Should its lenders demand that it shore up the balance sheet, shareholders would likely face severe dilution.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

While Hyatt Hotels's debt to EBITDA ratio (3.3) suggests that it uses some debt, its interest cover is very weak, at 1.3, suggesting high leverage. In large part that's due to the company's significant depreciation and amortisation charges, which arguably mean its EBITDA is a very generous measure of earnings, and its debt may be more of a burden than it first appears. So shareholders should probably be aware that interest expenses appear to have really impacted the business lately. However, the silver lining was that Hyatt Hotels achieved a positive EBIT of US$174m in the last twelve months, an improvement on the prior year's loss. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Hyatt Hotels can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So it is important to check how much of its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) converts to actual free cash flow. Over the last year, Hyatt Hotels actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT. That sort of strong cash generation warms our hearts like a puppy in a bumblebee suit.

Our View

Hyatt Hotels's interest cover and net debt to EBITDA definitely weigh on it, in our esteem. But its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow tells a very different story, and suggests some resilience. We think that Hyatt Hotels's debt does make it a bit risky, after considering the aforementioned data points together. Not all risk is bad, as it can boost share price returns if it pays off, but this debt risk is worth keeping in mind. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For instance, we've identified 2 warning signs for Hyatt Hotels (1 is a bit concerning) you should be aware of.

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

What are the risks and opportunities for Hyatt Hotels?

Hyatt Hotels Corporation operates as a hospitality company in the United States and internationally.

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Rewards

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 21.99% per year

  • Became profitable this year

Risks

  • Interest payments are not well covered by earnings

  • Significant insider selling over the past 3 months

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