Indian Oil (NSE:IOC) shareholders have endured a 5.8% loss from investing in the stock five years ago

By
Simply Wall St
Published
March 23, 2022
NSEI:IOC
Source: Shutterstock

Indian Oil Corporation Limited (NSE:IOC) shareholders should be happy to see the share price up 11% in the last quarter. But if you look at the last five years the returns have not been good. After all, the share price is down 35% in that time, significantly under-performing the market.

It's worthwhile assessing if the company's economics have been moving in lockstep with these underwhelming shareholder returns, or if there is some disparity between the two. So let's do just that.

View our latest analysis for Indian Oil

While the efficient markets hypothesis continues to be taught by some, it has been proven that markets are over-reactive dynamic systems, and investors are not always rational. One imperfect but simple way to consider how the market perception of a company has shifted is to compare the change in the earnings per share (EPS) with the share price movement.

While the share price declined over five years, Indian Oil actually managed to increase EPS by an average of 7.4% per year. So it doesn't seem like EPS is a great guide to understanding how the market is valuing the stock. Alternatively, growth expectations may have been unreasonable in the past.

Due to the lack of correlation between the EPS growth and the falling share price, it's worth taking a look at other metrics to try to understand the share price movement.

We note that the dividend has fallen in the last five years, so that may have contributed to the share price decline.

The graphic below depicts how earnings and revenue have changed over time (unveil the exact values by clicking on the image).

earnings-and-revenue-growth
NSEI:IOC Earnings and Revenue Growth March 23rd 2022

Indian Oil is well known by investors, and plenty of clever analysts have tried to predict the future profit levels. So we recommend checking out this free report showing consensus forecasts

What About Dividends?

When looking at investment returns, it is important to consider the difference between total shareholder return (TSR) and share price return. The TSR incorporates the value of any spin-offs or discounted capital raisings, along with any dividends, based on the assumption that the dividends are reinvested. It's fair to say that the TSR gives a more complete picture for stocks that pay a dividend. In the case of Indian Oil, it has a TSR of -5.8% for the last 5 years. That exceeds its share price return that we previously mentioned. And there's no prize for guessing that the dividend payments largely explain the divergence!

A Different Perspective

It's nice to see that Indian Oil shareholders have received a total shareholder return of 36% over the last year. Of course, that includes the dividend. That certainly beats the loss of about 1.1% per year over the last half decade. This makes us a little wary, but the business might have turned around its fortunes. While it is well worth considering the different impacts that market conditions can have on the share price, there are other factors that are even more important. Take risks, for example - Indian Oil has 3 warning signs (and 1 which shouldn't be ignored) we think you should know about.

If you are like me, then you will not want to miss this free list of growing companies that insiders are buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on IN exchanges.

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