Does CIFI Holdings (Group) (HKG:884) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
April 18, 2022
SEHK:884
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. Importantly, CIFI Holdings (Group) Co. Ltd. (HKG:884) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

View our latest analysis for CIFI Holdings (Group)

What Is CIFI Holdings (Group)'s Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that CIFI Holdings (Group) had CN¥114.1b of debt in December 2021, down from CN¥126.2b, one year before. However, it also had CN¥49.3b in cash, and so its net debt is CN¥64.8b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SEHK:884 Debt to Equity History April 18th 2022

How Strong Is CIFI Holdings (Group)'s Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that CIFI Holdings (Group) had liabilities of CN¥223.7b due within 12 months and liabilities of CN¥101.6b due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of CN¥49.3b and CN¥105.2b worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total CN¥170.9b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit casts a shadow over the CN¥32.6b company, like a colossus towering over mere mortals. So we'd watch its balance sheet closely, without a doubt. At the end of the day, CIFI Holdings (Group) would probably need a major re-capitalization if its creditors were to demand repayment.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

CIFI Holdings (Group)'s net debt is 4.4 times its EBITDA, which is a significant but still reasonable amount of leverage. However, its interest coverage of 1k is very high, suggesting that the interest expense on the debt is currently quite low. Importantly, CIFI Holdings (Group) grew its EBIT by 38% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if CIFI Holdings (Group) can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. In the last three years, CIFI Holdings (Group) created free cash flow amounting to 16% of its EBIT, an uninspiring performance. For us, cash conversion that low sparks a little paranoia about is ability to extinguish debt.

Our View

We'd go so far as to say CIFI Holdings (Group)'s level of total liabilities was disappointing. But on the bright side, its interest cover is a good sign, and makes us more optimistic. Looking at the balance sheet and taking into account all these factors, we do believe that debt is making CIFI Holdings (Group) stock a bit risky. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but we'd generally feel more comfortable with less leverage. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For instance, we've identified 5 warning signs for CIFI Holdings (Group) (1 can't be ignored) you should be aware of.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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