Agile Group Holdings (HKG:3383) Has A Somewhat Strained Balance Sheet

By
Simply Wall St
Published
August 22, 2021
SEHK:3383
Source: Shutterstock

Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about... and every practical investor I know worries about.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. We can see that Agile Group Holdings Limited (HKG:3383) does use debt in its business. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Agile Group Holdings

What Is Agile Group Holdings's Net Debt?

The chart below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that Agile Group Holdings had CN¥97.9b in debt in June 2021; about the same as the year before. However, it also had CN¥48.0b in cash, and so its net debt is CN¥49.9b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SEHK:3383 Debt to Equity History August 23rd 2021

A Look At Agile Group Holdings' Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, Agile Group Holdings had liabilities of CN¥172.8b due within 12 months, and liabilities of CN¥67.6b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had CN¥48.0b in cash and CN¥52.2b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total CN¥140.2b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

The deficiency here weighs heavily on the CN¥28.8b company itself, as if a child were struggling under the weight of an enormous back-pack full of books, his sports gear, and a trumpet. So we'd watch its balance sheet closely, without a doubt. After all, Agile Group Holdings would likely require a major re-capitalisation if it had to pay its creditors today.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Agile Group Holdings's net debt is 3.0 times its EBITDA, which is a significant but still reasonable amount of leverage. However, its interest coverage of 12.0 is very high, suggesting that the interest expense on the debt is currently quite low. We saw Agile Group Holdings grow its EBIT by 9.9% in the last twelve months. Whilst that hardly knocks our socks off it is a positive when it comes to debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Agile Group Holdings can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Over the last three years, Agile Group Holdings recorded negative free cash flow, in total. Debt is far more risky for companies with unreliable free cash flow, so shareholders should be hoping that the past expenditure will produce free cash flow in the future.

Our View

On the face of it, Agile Group Holdings's conversion of EBIT to free cash flow left us tentative about the stock, and its level of total liabilities was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. But on the bright side, its interest cover is a good sign, and makes us more optimistic. We're quite clear that we consider Agile Group Holdings to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example Agile Group Holdings has 4 warning signs (and 1 which makes us a bit uncomfortable) we think you should know about.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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