ABO Wind (HMSE:AB9) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet

By
Simply Wall St
Published
September 29, 2021
HMSE:AB9
Source: Shutterstock

The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We note that ABO Wind AG (HMSE:AB9) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for ABO Wind

What Is ABO Wind's Net Debt?

As you can see below, ABO Wind had €82.4m of debt at June 2021, down from €87.1m a year prior. On the flip side, it has €52.2m in cash leading to net debt of about €30.2m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
HMSE:AB9 Debt to Equity History September 30th 2021

A Look At ABO Wind's Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, ABO Wind had liabilities of €30.3m due within 12 months, and liabilities of €87.8m due beyond 12 months. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of €52.2m as well as receivables valued at €88.0m due within 12 months. So it actually has €22.1m more liquid assets than total liabilities.

This surplus suggests that ABO Wind has a conservative balance sheet, and could probably eliminate its debt without much difficulty.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

ABO Wind's net debt is only 0.84 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 26.4 times the size. So you could argue it is no more threatened by its debt than an elephant is by a mouse. On top of that, ABO Wind grew its EBIT by 37% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine ABO Wind's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Looking at the most recent three years, ABO Wind recorded free cash flow of 23% of its EBIT, which is weaker than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

The good news is that ABO Wind's demonstrated ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. But, on a more sombre note, we are a little concerned by its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow. Zooming out, ABO Wind seems to use debt quite reasonably; and that gets the nod from us. While debt does bring risk, when used wisely it can also bring a higher return on equity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. We've identified 4 warning signs with ABO Wind (at least 1 which is significant) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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