CCL Industries (TSE:CCL.B) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet

September 06, 2022
  •  Updated
November 21, 2022
TSX:CCL.B
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Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. Importantly, CCL Industries Inc. (TSE:CCL.B) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for CCL Industries

How Much Debt Does CCL Industries Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of June 2022 CCL Industries had CA$2.24b of debt, an increase on CA$1.81b, over one year. However, it also had CA$634.3m in cash, and so its net debt is CA$1.60b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
TSX:CCL.B Debt to Equity History September 6th 2022

How Strong Is CCL Industries' Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that CCL Industries had liabilities of CA$1.44b due within a year, and liabilities of CA$2.88b falling due after that. On the other hand, it had cash of CA$634.3m and CA$1.18b worth of receivables due within a year. So it has liabilities totalling CA$2.50b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

CCL Industries has a market capitalization of CA$11.4b, so it could very likely raise cash to ameliorate its balance sheet, if the need arose. However, it is still worthwhile taking a close look at its ability to pay off debt.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

CCL Industries's net debt is only 1.4 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT covers its interest expense a whopping 13.4 times over. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. While CCL Industries doesn't seem to have gained much on the EBIT line, at least earnings remain stable for now. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine CCL Industries's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. During the last three years, CCL Industries produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 71% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

The good news is that CCL Industries's demonstrated ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. And that's just the beginning of the good news since its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow is also very heartening. All these things considered, it appears that CCL Industries can comfortably handle its current debt levels. On the plus side, this leverage can boost shareholder returns, but the potential downside is more risk of loss, so it's worth monitoring the balance sheet. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Be aware that CCL Industries is showing 2 warning signs in our investment analysis , you should know about...

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

Valuation is complex, but we're helping make it simple.

Find out whether CCL Industries is potentially over or undervalued by checking out our comprehensive analysis, which includes fair value estimates, risks and warnings, dividends, insider transactions and financial health.

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