New Jersey Resources (NYSE:NJR) Takes On Some Risk With Its Use Of Debt

By
Simply Wall St
Published
February 25, 2022
NYSE:NJR
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. Importantly, New Jersey Resources Corporation (NYSE:NJR) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for New Jersey Resources

How Much Debt Does New Jersey Resources Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of December 2021 New Jersey Resources had US$2.80b of debt, an increase on US$2.36b, over one year. And it doesn't have much cash, so its net debt is about the same.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:NJR Debt to Equity History February 25th 2022

A Look At New Jersey Resources' Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that New Jersey Resources had liabilities of US$1.10b due within a year, and liabilities of US$3.17b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had US$1.26m in cash and US$329.1m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$3.93b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

This deficit is considerable relative to its market capitalization of US$3.98b, so it does suggest shareholders should keep an eye on New Jersey Resources' use of debt. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

With a net debt to EBITDA ratio of 6.2, it's fair to say New Jersey Resources does have a significant amount of debt. However, its interest coverage of 4.4 is reasonably strong, which is a good sign. Looking on the bright side, New Jersey Resources boosted its EBIT by a silky 42% in the last year. Like the milk of human kindness that sort of growth increases resilience, making the company more capable of managing debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if New Jersey Resources can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Over the last three years, New Jersey Resources saw substantial negative free cash flow, in total. While that may be a result of expenditure for growth, it does make the debt far more risky.

Our View

To be frank both New Jersey Resources's net debt to EBITDA and its track record of converting EBIT to free cash flow make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But at least it's pretty decent at growing its EBIT; that's encouraging. It's also worth noting that New Jersey Resources is in the Gas Utilities industry, which is often considered to be quite defensive. Looking at the balance sheet and taking into account all these factors, we do believe that debt is making New Jersey Resources stock a bit risky. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but we'd generally feel more comfortable with less leverage. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example, we've discovered 3 warning signs for New Jersey Resources (1 is significant!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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