Arko's (NASDAQ:ARKO) Returns On Capital Not Reflecting Well On The Business

By
Simply Wall St
Published
February 23, 2022
NasdaqCM:ARKO
Source: Shutterstock

Finding a business that has the potential to grow substantially is not easy, but it is possible if we look at a few key financial metrics. Ideally, a business will show two trends; firstly a growing return on capital employed (ROCE) and secondly, an increasing amount of capital employed. If you see this, it typically means it's a company with a great business model and plenty of profitable reinvestment opportunities. However, after investigating Arko (NASDAQ:ARKO), we don't think it's current trends fit the mold of a multi-bagger.

Return On Capital Employed (ROCE): What is it?

For those that aren't sure what ROCE is, it measures the amount of pre-tax profits a company can generate from the capital employed in its business. Analysts use this formula to calculate it for Arko:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.053 = US$130m ÷ (US$2.8b - US$372m) (Based on the trailing twelve months to September 2021).

Thus, Arko has an ROCE of 5.3%. Ultimately, that's a low return and it under-performs the Specialty Retail industry average of 20%.

See our latest analysis for Arko

roce
NasdaqCM:ARKO Return on Capital Employed February 23rd 2022

Above you can see how the current ROCE for Arko compares to its prior returns on capital, but there's only so much you can tell from the past. If you'd like to see what analysts are forecasting going forward, you should check out our free report for Arko.

What Does the ROCE Trend For Arko Tell Us?

Unfortunately, the trend isn't great with ROCE falling from 7.1% five years ago, while capital employed has grown 537%. However, some of the increase in capital employed could be attributed to the recent capital raising that's been completed prior to their latest reporting period, so keep that in mind when looking at the ROCE decrease. Arko probably hasn't received a full year of earnings yet from the new funds it raised, so these figures should be taken with a grain of salt.

On a related note, Arko has decreased its current liabilities to 13% of total assets. So we could link some of this to the decrease in ROCE. What's more, this can reduce some aspects of risk to the business because now the company's suppliers or short-term creditors are funding less of its operations. Since the business is basically funding more of its operations with it's own money, you could argue this has made the business less efficient at generating ROCE.

The Bottom Line On Arko's ROCE

While returns have fallen for Arko in recent times, we're encouraged to see that sales are growing and that the business is reinvesting in its operations. However, despite the promising trends, the stock has fallen 21% over the last year, so there might be an opportunity here for astute investors. So we think it'd be worthwhile to look further into this stock given the trends look encouraging.

One more thing: We've identified 2 warning signs with Arko (at least 1 which is a bit unpleasant) , and understanding these would certainly be useful.

For those who like to invest in solid companies, check out this free list of companies with solid balance sheets and high returns on equity.

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