Stock Analysis

Does WestRock (NYSE:WRK) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

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NYSE:WRK
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Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We can see that WestRock Company (NYSE:WRK) does use debt in its business. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

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What Is WestRock's Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that WestRock had US$7.93b of debt in September 2021, down from US$9.16b, one year before. However, it also had US$290.9m in cash, and so its net debt is US$7.64b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:WRK Debt to Equity History February 4th 2022

A Look At WestRock's Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, WestRock had liabilities of US$3.64b due within 12 months, and liabilities of US$13.9b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$290.9m as well as receivables valued at US$2.79b due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$14.5b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's massive market capitalization of US$12.1b, we think shareholders really should watch WestRock's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

WestRock has a debt to EBITDA ratio of 2.6 and its EBIT covered its interest expense 3.9 times. This suggests that while the debt levels are significant, we'd stop short of calling them problematic. On a slightly more positive note, WestRock grew its EBIT at 16% over the last year, further increasing its ability to manage debt. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if WestRock can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Over the last three years, WestRock recorded free cash flow worth a fulsome 83% of its EBIT, which is stronger than we'd usually expect. That puts it in a very strong position to pay down debt.

Our View

WestRock's level of total liabilities and interest cover definitely weigh on it, in our esteem. But the good news is it seems to be able to convert EBIT to free cash flow with ease. We think that WestRock's debt does make it a bit risky, after considering the aforementioned data points together. That's not necessarily a bad thing, since leverage can boost returns on equity, but it is something to be aware of. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example - WestRock has 3 warning signs we think you should be aware of.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

What are the risks and opportunities for WestRock?

WestRock Company, together with its subsidiaries, provides fiber-based paper and packaging solutions in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

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Rewards

  • Trading at 57.7% below our estimate of its fair value

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 12.59% per year

Risks

  • Significant insider selling over the past 3 months

  • Large one-off items impacting financial results

  • Has a high level of debt

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