Would Feerum (WSE:FEE) Be Better Off With Less Debt?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
November 30, 2021
WSE:FEE
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We can see that Feerum S.A. (WSE:FEE) does use debt in its business. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Feerum

What Is Feerum's Debt?

As you can see below, Feerum had zł26.7m of debt at June 2021, down from zł51.4m a year prior. However, because it has a cash reserve of zł15.1m, its net debt is less, at about zł11.6m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
WSE:FEE Debt to Equity History December 1st 2021

How Strong Is Feerum's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Feerum had liabilities of zł56.1m due within 12 months, and liabilities of zł24.4m due beyond 12 months. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of zł15.1m as well as receivables valued at zł28.5m due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling zł36.9m more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

While this might seem like a lot, it is not so bad since Feerum has a market capitalization of zł87.7m, and so it could probably strengthen its balance sheet by raising capital if it needed to. However, it is still worthwhile taking a close look at its ability to pay off debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is Feerum's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

Over 12 months, Feerum made a loss at the EBIT level, and saw its revenue drop to zł100m, which is a fall of 56%. To be frank that doesn't bode well.

Caveat Emptor

While Feerum's falling revenue is about as heartwarming as a wet blanket, arguably its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) loss is even less appealing. Indeed, it lost zł7.8m at the EBIT level. When we look at that and recall the liabilities on its balance sheet, relative to cash, it seems unwise to us for the company to have any debt. Quite frankly we think the balance sheet is far from match-fit, although it could be improved with time. We would feel better if it turned its trailing twelve month loss of zł15m into a profit. So to be blunt we do think it is risky. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Be aware that Feerum is showing 1 warning sign in our investment analysis , you should know about...

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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