Here's Why EG Industries Berhad (KLSE:EG) Is Weighed Down By Its Debt Load

By
Simply Wall St
Published
November 26, 2021
KLSE:EG
Source: Shutterstock

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We can see that EG Industries Berhad (KLSE:EG) does use debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for EG Industries Berhad

What Is EG Industries Berhad's Net Debt?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that EG Industries Berhad had debt of RM209.6m at the end of June 2021, a reduction from RM230.0m over a year. However, it also had RM10.7m in cash, and so its net debt is RM199.0m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
KLSE:EG Debt to Equity History November 27th 2021

How Healthy Is EG Industries Berhad's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that EG Industries Berhad had liabilities of RM518.5m due within a year, and liabilities of RM43.8m falling due after that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of RM10.7m as well as receivables valued at RM308.6m due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by RM243.1m.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's market capitalization of RM192.2m, we think shareholders really should watch EG Industries Berhad's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

EG Industries Berhad has a debt to EBITDA ratio of 3.4 and its EBIT covered its interest expense 3.8 times. Taken together this implies that, while we wouldn't want to see debt levels rise, we think it can handle its current leverage. One redeeming factor for EG Industries Berhad is that it turned last year's EBIT loss into a gain of RM20m, over the last twelve months. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But you can't view debt in total isolation; since EG Industries Berhad will need earnings to service that debt. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So it is important to check how much of its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) converts to actual free cash flow. Over the last year, EG Industries Berhad saw substantial negative free cash flow, in total. While that may be a result of expenditure for growth, it does make the debt far more risky.

Our View

Mulling over EG Industries Berhad's attempt at converting EBIT to free cash flow, we're certainly not enthusiastic. Having said that, its ability to grow its EBIT isn't such a worry. We're quite clear that we consider EG Industries Berhad to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Case in point: We've spotted 4 warning signs for EG Industries Berhad you should be aware of, and 2 of them are a bit unpleasant.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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