Stock Analysis

These 4 Measures Indicate That Britannia Industries (NSE:BRITANNIA) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well

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NSEI:BRITANNIA
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Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. As with many other companies Britannia Industries Limited (NSE:BRITANNIA) makes use of debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Britannia Industries

What Is Britannia Industries's Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of September 2021, Britannia Industries had ₹28.2b of debt, up from ₹24.5b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, because it has a cash reserve of ₹7.51b, its net debt is less, at about ₹20.7b.

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NSEI:BRITANNIA Debt to Equity History January 2nd 2022

A Look At Britannia Industries' Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Britannia Industries had liabilities of ₹44.6b due within a year, and liabilities of ₹7.73b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had ₹7.51b in cash and ₹15.0b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling ₹29.8b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Of course, Britannia Industries has a titanic market capitalization of ₹868.6b, so these liabilities are probably manageable. However, we do think it is worth keeping an eye on its balance sheet strength, as it may change over time.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Britannia Industries has a low debt to EBITDA ratio of only 0.93. But the really cool thing is that it actually managed to receive more interest than it paid, over the last year. So there's no doubt this company can take on debt while staying cool as a cucumber. But the other side of the story is that Britannia Industries saw its EBIT decline by 6.0% over the last year. If earnings continue to decline at that rate the company may have increasing difficulty managing its debt load. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Britannia Industries can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Britannia Industries recorded free cash flow worth 59% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

Happily, Britannia Industries's impressive interest cover implies it has the upper hand on its debt. But truth be told we feel its EBIT growth rate does undermine this impression a bit. All these things considered, it appears that Britannia Industries can comfortably handle its current debt levels. On the plus side, this leverage can boost shareholder returns, but the potential downside is more risk of loss, so it's worth monitoring the balance sheet. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. These risks can be hard to spot. Every company has them, and we've spotted 2 warning signs for Britannia Industries you should know about.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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