Stock Analysis

Britannia Industries (NSE:BRITANNIA) Seems To Use Debt Rather Sparingly

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NSEI:BRITANNIA
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Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. Importantly, Britannia Industries Limited (NSE:BRITANNIA) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Britannia Industries

What Is Britannia Industries's Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of September 2020 Britannia Industries had ₹24.3b of debt, an increase on ₹13.6b, over one year. However, it does have ₹5.30b in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about ₹19.0b.

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NSEI:BRITANNIA Debt to Equity History February 13th 2021

How Healthy Is Britannia Industries' Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Britannia Industries had liabilities of ₹39.3b due within 12 months, and liabilities of ₹8.32b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had ₹5.30b in cash and ₹15.3b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling ₹27.1b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Since publicly traded Britannia Industries shares are worth a very impressive total of ₹834.1b, it seems unlikely that this level of liabilities would be a major threat. However, we do think it is worth keeping an eye on its balance sheet strength, as it may change over time.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Britannia Industries has net debt of just 0.77 times EBITDA, suggesting it could ramp leverage without breaking a sweat. And remarkably, despite having net debt, it actually received more in interest over the last twelve months than it had to pay. So there's no doubt this company can take on debt while staying cool as a cucumber. In addition to that, we're happy to report that Britannia Industries has boosted its EBIT by 37%, thus reducing the spectre of future debt repayments. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Britannia Industries can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Britannia Industries recorded free cash flow worth 63% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

The good news is that Britannia Industries's demonstrated ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. And the good news does not stop there, as its EBIT growth rate also supports that impression! Considering this range of factors, it seems to us that Britannia Industries is quite prudent with its debt, and the risks seem well managed. So we're not worried about the use of a little leverage on the balance sheet. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. To that end, you should be aware of the 3 warning signs we've spotted with Britannia Industries .

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

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