These 4 Measures Indicate That Marine Electricals (India) (NSE:MARINE) Is Using Debt Safely

September 27, 2022
  •  Updated
November 14, 2022
NSEI:MARINE
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. Importantly, Marine Electricals (India) Limited (NSE:MARINE) does carry debt. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Marine Electricals (India)

How Much Debt Does Marine Electricals (India) Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that Marine Electricals (India) had ₹366.2m of debt in March 2022, down from ₹545.0m, one year before. However, it also had ₹90.4m in cash, and so its net debt is ₹275.8m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NSEI:MARINE Debt to Equity History September 27th 2022

A Look At Marine Electricals (India)'s Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Marine Electricals (India) had liabilities of ₹1.84b falling due within a year, and liabilities of ₹78.6m due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had ₹90.4m in cash and ₹1.80b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its total liabilities are just about perfectly matched by its shorter-term, liquid assets.

This state of affairs indicates that Marine Electricals (India)'s balance sheet looks quite solid, as its total liabilities are just about equal to its liquid assets. So while it's hard to imagine that the ₹3.72b company is struggling for cash, we still think it's worth monitoring its balance sheet.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Looking at its net debt to EBITDA of 0.69 and interest cover of 4.0 times, it seems to us that Marine Electricals (India) is probably using debt in a pretty reasonable way. But the interest payments are certainly sufficient to have us thinking about how affordable its debt is. Also relevant is that Marine Electricals (India) has grown its EBIT by a very respectable 25% in the last year, thus enhancing its ability to pay down debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is Marine Electricals (India)'s earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. During the last three years, Marine Electricals (India) generated free cash flow amounting to a very robust 87% of its EBIT, more than we'd expect. That puts it in a very strong position to pay down debt.

Our View

Happily, Marine Electricals (India)'s impressive conversion of EBIT to free cash flow implies it has the upper hand on its debt. But, on a more sombre note, we are a little concerned by its interest cover. Looking at the bigger picture, we think Marine Electricals (India)'s use of debt seems quite reasonable and we're not concerned about it. After all, sensible leverage can boost returns on equity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example - Marine Electricals (India) has 2 warning signs we think you should be aware of.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

Valuation is complex, but we're helping make it simple.

Find out whether Marine Electricals (India) is potentially over or undervalued by checking out our comprehensive analysis, which includes fair value estimates, risks and warnings, dividends, insider transactions and financial health.

View the Free Analysis