Stock Analysis

Here's Why UNO Minda (NSE:UNOMINDA) Can Manage Its Debt Responsibly

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NSEI:UNOMINDA
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Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about... and every practical investor I know worries about.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. We note that UNO Minda Limited (NSE:UNOMINDA) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

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What Is UNO Minda's Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of September 2022, UNO Minda had ₹9.71b of debt, up from ₹7.01b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. On the flip side, it has ₹2.65b in cash leading to net debt of about ₹7.06b.

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NSEI:UNOMINDA Debt to Equity History December 1st 2022

How Strong Is UNO Minda's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, UNO Minda had liabilities of ₹28.7b due within 12 months, and liabilities of ₹7.03b due beyond 12 months. On the other hand, it had cash of ₹2.65b and ₹16.8b worth of receivables due within a year. So it has liabilities totalling ₹16.3b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Since publicly traded UNO Minda shares are worth a total of ₹314.4b, it seems unlikely that this level of liabilities would be a major threat. Having said that, it's clear that we should continue to monitor its balance sheet, lest it change for the worse.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

UNO Minda's net debt is only 0.66 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT covers its interest expense a whopping 16.0 times over. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. Also positive, UNO Minda grew its EBIT by 22% in the last year, and that should make it easier to pay down debt, going forward. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine UNO Minda's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Considering the last three years, UNO Minda actually recorded a cash outflow, overall. Debt is usually more expensive, and almost always more risky in the hands of a company with negative free cash flow. Shareholders ought to hope for an improvement.

Our View

Happily, UNO Minda's impressive interest cover implies it has the upper hand on its debt. But we must concede we find its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow has the opposite effect. All these things considered, it appears that UNO Minda can comfortably handle its current debt levels. On the plus side, this leverage can boost shareholder returns, but the potential downside is more risk of loss, so it's worth monitoring the balance sheet. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For instance, we've identified 1 warning sign for UNO Minda that you should be aware of.

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

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