Here's Why CGN Mining (HKG:1164) Has A Meaningful Debt Burden

By
Simply Wall St
Published
August 27, 2021
SEHK:1164
Source: Shutterstock

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. We can see that CGN Mining Company Limited (HKG:1164) does use debt in its business. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for CGN Mining

What Is CGN Mining's Debt?

The image below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that CGN Mining had debt of HK$1.31b at the end of June 2021, a reduction from HK$1.62b over a year. However, because it has a cash reserve of HK$1.28b, its net debt is less, at about HK$29.3m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SEHK:1164 Debt to Equity History August 27th 2021

How Healthy Is CGN Mining's Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that CGN Mining had liabilities of HK$742.2m falling due within a year, and liabilities of HK$889.7m due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had HK$1.28b in cash and HK$204.0m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by HK$148.1m.

Given CGN Mining has a market capitalization of HK$4.22b, it's hard to believe these liabilities pose much threat. Having said that, it's clear that we should continue to monitor its balance sheet, lest it change for the worse. But either way, CGN Mining has virtually no net debt, so it's fair to say it does not have a heavy debt load!

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

While CGN Mining's low debt to EBITDA ratio of 0.26 suggests only modest use of debt, the fact that EBIT only covered the interest expense by 3.5 times last year does give us pause. So we'd recommend keeping a close eye on the impact financing costs are having on the business. Importantly, CGN Mining's EBIT fell a jaw-dropping 23% in the last twelve months. If that decline continues then paying off debt will be harder than selling foie gras at a vegan convention. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is CGN Mining's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. During the last three years, CGN Mining burned a lot of cash. While investors are no doubt expecting a reversal of that situation in due course, it clearly does mean its use of debt is more risky.

Our View

To be frank both CGN Mining's conversion of EBIT to free cash flow and its track record of (not) growing its EBIT make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But on the bright side, its net debt to EBITDA is a good sign, and makes us more optimistic. Once we consider all the factors above, together, it seems to us that CGN Mining's debt is making it a bit risky. Some people like that sort of risk, but we're mindful of the potential pitfalls, so we'd probably prefer it carry less debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example, we've discovered 3 warning signs for CGN Mining (2 are potentially serious!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

If you're looking for stocks to buy, use the lowest-cost* platform that is rated #1 Overall by Barron’s, Interactive Brokers. Trade stocks, options, futures, forex, bonds and funds on 135 markets, all from a single integrated account. Promoted


Discounted cash flow calculation for every stock

Simply Wall St does a detailed discounted cash flow calculation every 6 hours for every stock on the market, so if you want to find the intrinsic value of any company just search here. It’s FREE.

Make Confident Investment Decisions

Simply Wall St's Editorial Team provides unbiased, factual reporting on global stocks using in-depth fundamental analysis.
Find out more about our editorial guidelines and team.