Stock Analysis

Nuix's (ASX:NXL) Returns On Capital Not Reflecting Well On The Business

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ASX:NXL
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Did you know there are some financial metrics that can provide clues of a potential multi-bagger? Typically, we'll want to notice a trend of growing return on capital employed (ROCE) and alongside that, an expanding base of capital employed. Put simply, these types of businesses are compounding machines, meaning they are continually reinvesting their earnings at ever-higher rates of return. Having said that, from a first glance at Nuix (ASX:NXL) we aren't jumping out of our chairs at how returns are trending, but let's have a deeper look.

Understanding Return On Capital Employed (ROCE)

Just to clarify if you're unsure, ROCE is a metric for evaluating how much pre-tax income (in percentage terms) a company earns on the capital invested in its business. The formula for this calculation on Nuix is:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.11 = AU$34m ÷ (AU$364m - AU$60m) (Based on the trailing twelve months to June 2021).

Thus, Nuix has an ROCE of 11%. That's a pretty standard return and it's in line with the industry average of 11%.

View our latest analysis for Nuix

roce
ASX:NXL Return on Capital Employed February 23rd 2022

In the above chart we have measured Nuix's prior ROCE against its prior performance, but the future is arguably more important. If you'd like to see what analysts are forecasting going forward, you should check out our free report for Nuix.

How Are Returns Trending?

On the surface, the trend of ROCE at Nuix doesn't inspire confidence. Over the last four years, returns on capital have decreased to 11% from 17% four years ago. However it looks like Nuix might be reinvesting for long term growth because while capital employed has increased, the company's sales haven't changed much in the last 12 months. It's worth keeping an eye on the company's earnings from here on to see if these investments do end up contributing to the bottom line.

The Bottom Line On Nuix's ROCE

In summary, Nuix is reinvesting funds back into the business for growth but unfortunately it looks like sales haven't increased much just yet. It seems that investors have little hope of these trends getting any better and that may have partly contributed to the stock collapsing 85% in the last year. All in all, the inherent trends aren't typical of multi-baggers, so if that's what you're after, we think you might have more luck elsewhere.

If you want to know some of the risks facing Nuix we've found 2 warning signs (1 can't be ignored!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

While Nuix may not currently earn the highest returns, we've compiled a list of companies that currently earn more than 25% return on equity. Check out this free list here.

Valuation is complex, but we're helping make it simple.

Find out whether Nuix is potentially over or undervalued by checking out our comprehensive analysis, which includes fair value estimates, risks and warnings, dividends, insider transactions and financial health.

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