MTN Group (JSE:MTN) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet

By
Simply Wall St
Published
December 19, 2021
JSE:MTN
Source: Shutterstock

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. As with many other companies MTN Group Limited (JSE:MTN) makes use of debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for MTN Group

What Is MTN Group's Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that MTN Group had R90.8b of debt in June 2021, down from R112.9b, one year before. On the flip side, it has R36.9b in cash leading to net debt of about R53.9b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
JSE:MTN Debt to Equity History December 19th 2021

A Look At MTN Group's Liabilities

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that MTN Group had liabilities of R108.6b due within 12 months and liabilities of R129.8b due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had R36.9b in cash and R32.1b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling R169.4b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

MTN Group has a very large market capitalization of R310.6b, so it could very likely raise cash to ameliorate its balance sheet, if the need arose. However, it is still worthwhile taking a close look at its ability to pay off debt.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

While MTN Group's low debt to EBITDA ratio of 0.72 suggests only modest use of debt, the fact that EBIT only covered the interest expense by 4.0 times last year does give us pause. So we'd recommend keeping a close eye on the impact financing costs are having on the business. We note that MTN Group grew its EBIT by 24% in the last year, and that should make it easier to pay down debt, going forward. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine MTN Group's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. In the last three years, MTN Group's free cash flow amounted to 44% of its EBIT, less than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

MTN Group's EBIT growth rate was a real positive on this analysis, as was its net debt to EBITDA. Having said that, its interest cover somewhat sensitizes us to potential future risks to the balance sheet. When we consider all the elements mentioned above, it seems to us that MTN Group is managing its debt quite well. But a word of caution: we think debt levels are high enough to justify ongoing monitoring. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example, we've discovered 3 warning signs for MTN Group that you should be aware of before investing here.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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