Such Is Life: How NETGEAR (NASDAQ:NTGR) Shareholders Saw Their Shares Drop 66%

As an investor its worth striving to ensure your overall portfolio beats the market average. But in any portfolio, there are likely to be some stocks that fall short of that benchmark. We regret to report that long term NETGEAR, Inc. (NASDAQ:NTGR) shareholders have had that experience, with the share price dropping 66% in three years, versus a market return of about 12%. The more recent news is of little comfort, with the share price down 50% in a year. Furthermore, it’s down 28% in about a quarter. That’s not much fun for holders. But this could be related to the weak market, which is down 22% in the same period.

View our latest analysis for NETGEAR

While the efficient markets hypothesis continues to be taught by some, it has been proven that markets are over-reactive dynamic systems, and investors are not always rational. One imperfect but simple way to consider how the market perception of a company has shifted is to compare the change in the earnings per share (EPS) with the share price movement.

During the three years that the share price fell, NETGEAR’s earnings per share (EPS) dropped by 27% each year. This change in EPS is reasonably close to the 30% average annual decrease in the share price. So it seems that investor expectations of the company are staying pretty steady, despite the disappointment. Rather, the share price has approximately tracked EPS growth.

The graphic below depicts how EPS has changed over time (unveil the exact values by clicking on the image).

NasdaqGS:NTGR Past and Future Earnings, March 18th 2020
NasdaqGS:NTGR Past and Future Earnings, March 18th 2020

We know that NETGEAR has improved its bottom line lately, but is it going to grow revenue? If you’re interested, you could check this free report showing consensus revenue forecasts.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

Investors should note that there’s a difference between NETGEAR’s total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price change, which we’ve covered above. The TSR attempts to capture the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested) as well as any spin-offs or discounted capital raisings offered to shareholders. NETGEAR hasn’t been paying dividends, but its TSR of -45% exceeds its share price return of -66%, implying it has either spun-off a business, or raised capital at a discount; thereby providing additional value to shareholders.

A Different Perspective

While the broader market lost about 11% in the twelve months, NETGEAR shareholders did even worse, losing 50%. Having said that, it’s inevitable that some stocks will be oversold in a falling market. The key is to keep your eyes on the fundamental developments. Regrettably, last year’s performance caps off a bad run, with the shareholders facing a total loss of 2.4% per year over five years. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. To that end, you should be aware of the 1 warning sign we’ve spotted with NETGEAR .

We will like NETGEAR better if we see some big insider buys. While we wait, check out this free list of growing companies with considerable, recent, insider buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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