Stock Analysis

Trade Desk (NASDAQ:TTD) Could Be Struggling To Allocate Capital

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NasdaqGM:TTD
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What trends should we look for it we want to identify stocks that can multiply in value over the long term? Ideally, a business will show two trends; firstly a growing return on capital employed (ROCE) and secondly, an increasing amount of capital employed. This shows us that it's a compounding machine, able to continually reinvest its earnings back into the business and generate higher returns. However, after briefly looking over the numbers, we don't think Trade Desk (NASDAQ:TTD) has the makings of a multi-bagger going forward, but let's have a look at why that may be.

Understanding Return On Capital Employed (ROCE)

Just to clarify if you're unsure, ROCE is a metric for evaluating how much pre-tax income (in percentage terms) a company earns on the capital invested in its business. Analysts use this formula to calculate it for Trade Desk:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.07 = US$125m ÷ (US$3.6b - US$1.8b) (Based on the trailing twelve months to December 2021).

Therefore, Trade Desk has an ROCE of 7.0%. Ultimately, that's a low return and it under-performs the Software industry average of 9.4%.

Check out our latest analysis for Trade Desk

roce
NasdaqGM:TTD Return on Capital Employed April 3rd 2022

Above you can see how the current ROCE for Trade Desk compares to its prior returns on capital, but there's only so much you can tell from the past. If you'd like to see what analysts are forecasting going forward, you should check out our free report for Trade Desk.

What Can We Tell From Trade Desk's ROCE Trend?

When we looked at the ROCE trend at Trade Desk, we didn't gain much confidence. To be more specific, ROCE has fallen from 30% over the last five years. However, given capital employed and revenue have both increased it appears that the business is currently pursuing growth, at the consequence of short term returns. If these investments prove successful, this can bode very well for long term stock performance.

On a side note, Trade Desk has done well to pay down its current liabilities to 50% of total assets. That could partly explain why the ROCE has dropped. What's more, this can reduce some aspects of risk to the business because now the company's suppliers or short-term creditors are funding less of its operations. Since the business is basically funding more of its operations with it's own money, you could argue this has made the business less efficient at generating ROCE. Keep in mind 50% is still pretty high, so those risks are still somewhat prevalent.

Our Take On Trade Desk's ROCE

While returns have fallen for Trade Desk in recent times, we're encouraged to see that sales are growing and that the business is reinvesting in its operations. And the stock has done incredibly well with a 1,855% return over the last five years, so long term investors are no doubt ecstatic with that result. So should these growth trends continue, we'd be optimistic on the stock going forward.

If you want to continue researching Trade Desk, you might be interested to know about the 3 warning signs that our analysis has discovered.

For those who like to invest in solid companies, check out this free list of companies with solid balance sheets and high returns on equity.

What are the risks and opportunities for Trade Desk?

Trade Desk, Inc. operates as a technology company in the United States and internationally.

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Rewards

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 41.88% per year

Risks

No risks detected for TTD from our risks checks.

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