Stock Analysis

Is Automatic Data Processing (NASDAQ:ADP) Using Too Much Debt?

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NasdaqGS:ADP
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The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. As with many other companies Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (NASDAQ:ADP) makes use of debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Automatic Data Processing

What Is Automatic Data Processing's Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of June 2021 Automatic Data Processing had US$3.01b of debt, an increase on US$2.02b, over one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$2.58b, its net debt is less, at about US$433.3m.

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NasdaqGS:ADP Debt to Equity History October 15th 2021

How Strong Is Automatic Data Processing's Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Automatic Data Processing had liabilities of US$38.1b due within 12 months and liabilities of US$5.01b due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$2.58b as well as receivables valued at US$2.73b due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$37.8b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

While this might seem like a lot, it is not so bad since Automatic Data Processing has a huge market capitalization of US$88.1b, and so it could probably strengthen its balance sheet by raising capital if it needed to. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk. But either way, Automatic Data Processing has virtually no net debt, so it's fair to say it does not have a heavy debt load!

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Automatic Data Processing has a low net debt to EBITDA ratio of only 0.11. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 145 times the size. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. While Automatic Data Processing doesn't seem to have gained much on the EBIT line, at least earnings remain stable for now. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Automatic Data Processing's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Automatic Data Processing recorded free cash flow worth 73% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

The good news is that Automatic Data Processing's demonstrated ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. And that's just the beginning of the good news since its net debt to EBITDA is also very heartening. Taking all this data into account, it seems to us that Automatic Data Processing takes a pretty sensible approach to debt. That means they are taking on a bit more risk, in the hope of boosting shareholder returns. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. Be aware that Automatic Data Processing is showing 2 warning signs in our investment analysis , you should know about...

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

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