Venator Materials (NYSE:VNTR) Seems To Be Using A Lot Of Debt

By
Simply Wall St
Published
February 23, 2022
NYSE:VNTR
Source: Shutterstock

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. As with many other companies Venator Materials PLC (NYSE:VNTR) makes use of debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Having said that, the most common situation is where a company manages its debt reasonably well - and to its own advantage. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Venator Materials

How Much Debt Does Venator Materials Carry?

As you can see below, Venator Materials had US$965.0m of debt, at September 2021, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, it also had US$161.0m in cash, and so its net debt is US$804.0m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:VNTR Debt to Equity History February 23rd 2022

A Look At Venator Materials' Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Venator Materials had liabilities of US$451.0m due within a year, and liabilities of US$1.33b falling due after that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$161.0m and US$394.0m worth of receivables due within a year. So it has liabilities totalling US$1.23b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

This deficit casts a shadow over the US$230.1m company, like a colossus towering over mere mortals. So we definitely think shareholders need to watch this one closely. After all, Venator Materials would likely require a major re-capitalisation if it had to pay its creditors today.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Venator Materials shareholders face the double whammy of a high net debt to EBITDA ratio (5.5), and fairly weak interest coverage, since EBIT is just 0.31 times the interest expense. The debt burden here is substantial. The silver lining is that Venator Materials grew its EBIT by 260% last year, which nourishing like the idealism of youth. If it can keep walking that path it will be in a position to shed its debt with relative ease. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Venator Materials can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the last three years, Venator Materials saw substantial negative free cash flow, in total. While that may be a result of expenditure for growth, it does make the debt far more risky.

Our View

To be frank both Venator Materials's conversion of EBIT to free cash flow and its track record of staying on top of its total liabilities make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But at least it's pretty decent at growing its EBIT; that's encouraging. We're quite clear that we consider Venator Materials to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. For example, we've discovered 1 warning sign for Venator Materials that you should be aware of before investing here.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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