Stock Analysis

Here's Why Marathon Petroleum (NYSE:MPC) Has A Meaningful Debt Burden

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NYSE:MPC
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Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We can see that Marathon Petroleum Corporation (NYSE:MPC) does use debt in its business. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Marathon Petroleum

What Is Marathon Petroleum's Debt?

The chart below, which you can click on for greater detail, shows that Marathon Petroleum had US$31.8b in debt in March 2021; about the same as the year before. And it doesn't have much cash, so its net debt is about the same.

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NYSE:MPC Debt to Equity History July 5th 2021

How Healthy Is Marathon Petroleum's Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Marathon Petroleum had liabilities of US$16.1b falling due within a year, and liabilities of US$41.1b due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$624.0m as well as receivables valued at US$9.57b due within 12 months. So its liabilities total US$47.0b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's huge US$38.9b market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. In the scenario where the company had to clean up its balance sheet quickly, it seems likely shareholders would suffer extensive dilution.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Weak interest cover of 0.46 times and a disturbingly high net debt to EBITDA ratio of 7.8 hit our confidence in Marathon Petroleum like a one-two punch to the gut. The debt burden here is substantial. Worse, Marathon Petroleum's EBIT was down 61% over the last year. If earnings continue to follow that trajectory, paying off that debt load will be harder than convincing us to run a marathon in the rain. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Marathon Petroleum can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. Happily for any shareholders, Marathon Petroleum actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT over the last three years. That sort of strong cash conversion gets us as excited as the crowd when the beat drops at a Daft Punk concert.

Our View

To be frank both Marathon Petroleum's interest cover and its track record of (not) growing its EBIT make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But at least it's pretty decent at converting EBIT to free cash flow; that's encouraging. We're quite clear that we consider Marathon Petroleum to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. We've identified 2 warning signs with Marathon Petroleum (at least 1 which is a bit unpleasant) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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