Here's Why PVH (NYSE:PVH) Can Manage Its Debt Responsibly

By
Simply Wall St
Published
March 10, 2022
NYSE:PVH
Source: Shutterstock

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. Importantly, PVH Corp. (NYSE:PVH) does carry debt. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for PVH

What Is PVH's Net Debt?

As you can see below, PVH had US$2.67b of debt at October 2021, down from US$3.52b a year prior. However, it does have US$1.30b in cash offsetting this, leading to net debt of about US$1.37b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:PVH Debt to Equity History March 10th 2022

How Strong Is PVH's Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that PVH had liabilities of US$2.66b falling due within a year, and liabilities of US$4.99b due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had US$1.30b in cash and US$936.6m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$5.41b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's market capitalization of US$5.27b, we think shareholders really should watch PVH's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Looking at its net debt to EBITDA of 1.2 and interest cover of 6.9 times, it seems to us that PVH is probably using debt in a pretty reasonable way. But the interest payments are certainly sufficient to have us thinking about how affordable its debt is. It was also good to see that despite losing money on the EBIT line last year, PVH turned things around in the last 12 months, delivering and EBIT of US$788m. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine PVH's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So it's worth checking how much of the earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) is backed by free cash flow. Happily for any shareholders, PVH actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT over the last year. That sort of strong cash conversion gets us as excited as the crowd when the beat drops at a Daft Punk concert.

Our View

When it comes to the balance sheet, the standout positive for PVH was the fact that it seems able to convert EBIT to free cash flow confidently. However, our other observations weren't so heartening. For example, its level of total liabilities makes us a little nervous about its debt. Looking at all this data makes us feel a little cautious about PVH's debt levels. While we appreciate debt can enhance returns on equity, we'd suggest that shareholders keep close watch on its debt levels, lest they increase. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. Be aware that PVH is showing 1 warning sign in our investment analysis , you should know about...

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

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