Stock Analysis

Does Alamo Group (NYSE:ALG) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

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NYSE:ALG
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Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We can see that Alamo Group Inc. (NYSE:ALG) does use debt in its business. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

Check out our latest analysis for Alamo Group

What Is Alamo Group's Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of June 2022 Alamo Group had US$371.1m of debt, an increase on US$314.9m, over one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$75.9m, its net debt is less, at about US$295.2m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NYSE:ALG Debt to Equity History October 4th 2022

How Strong Is Alamo Group's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Alamo Group had liabilities of US$189.6m due within a year, and liabilities of US$406.3m falling due after that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$75.9m and US$308.4m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$211.6m.

Given Alamo Group has a market capitalization of US$1.51b, it's hard to believe these liabilities pose much threat. Having said that, it's clear that we should continue to monitor its balance sheet, lest it change for the worse.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

We'd say that Alamo Group's moderate net debt to EBITDA ratio ( being 1.7), indicates prudence when it comes to debt. And its commanding EBIT of 12.5 times its interest expense, implies the debt load is as light as a peacock feather. One way Alamo Group could vanquish its debt would be if it stops borrowing more but continues to grow EBIT at around 17%, as it did over the last year. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Alamo Group's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Over the most recent three years, Alamo Group recorded free cash flow worth 60% of its EBIT, which is around normal, given free cash flow excludes interest and tax. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

The good news is that Alamo Group's demonstrated ability to cover its interest expense with its EBIT delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. And that's just the beginning of the good news since its EBIT growth rate is also very heartening. Taking all this data into account, it seems to us that Alamo Group takes a pretty sensible approach to debt. That means they are taking on a bit more risk, in the hope of boosting shareholder returns. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. We've identified 2 warning signs with Alamo Group (at least 1 which is concerning) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

What are the risks and opportunities for Alamo Group?

Alamo Group Inc. designs, manufactures, distributes, and services vegetation management and infrastructure maintenance equipment for governmental, industrial, and agricultural uses worldwide.

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Rewards

  • Trading at 7.3% below our estimate of its fair value

  • Earnings are forecast to grow 13.41% per year

  • Earnings grew by 30.9% over the past year

Risks

No risks detected for ALG from our risks checks.

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About NYSE:ALG

Alamo Group

Alamo Group Inc. designs, manufactures, distributes, and services vegetation management and infrastructure maintenance equipment for governmental, industrial, and agricultural uses worldwide.

The Snowflake is a visual investment summary with the score of each axis being calculated by 6 checks in 5 areas.

Analysis AreaScore (0-6)
Valuation3
Future Growth1
Past Performance5
Financial Health4
Dividends0

Read more about these checks in the individual report sections or in our analysis model.

Solid track record with adequate balance sheet.