Trelleborg (STO:TREL B) Could Easily Take On More Debt

Published
August 13, 2022
OM:TREL B
Source: Shutterstock

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. As with many other companies Trelleborg AB (publ) (STO:TREL B) makes use of debt. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Trelleborg

How Much Debt Does Trelleborg Carry?

As you can see below, at the end of June 2022, Trelleborg had kr11.4b of debt, up from kr10.2b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. On the flip side, it has kr2.36b in cash leading to net debt of about kr9.04b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
OM:TREL B Debt to Equity History August 13th 2022

A Look At Trelleborg's Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Trelleborg had liabilities of kr15.2b due within a year, and liabilities of kr11.4b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had kr2.36b in cash and kr6.54b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total kr17.7b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

While this might seem like a lot, it is not so bad since Trelleborg has a market capitalization of kr62.6b, and so it could probably strengthen its balance sheet by raising capital if it needed to. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Trelleborg's net debt is only 1.3 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 25.9 times the size. So you could argue it is no more threatened by its debt than an elephant is by a mouse. On top of that, Trelleborg grew its EBIT by 38% over the last twelve months, and that growth will make it easier to handle its debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Trelleborg can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Over the last three years, Trelleborg recorded free cash flow worth a fulsome 90% of its EBIT, which is stronger than we'd usually expect. That puts it in a very strong position to pay down debt.

Our View

Happily, Trelleborg's impressive interest cover implies it has the upper hand on its debt. And that's just the beginning of the good news since its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow is also very heartening. Looking at the bigger picture, we think Trelleborg's use of debt seems quite reasonable and we're not concerned about it. After all, sensible leverage can boost returns on equity. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. These risks can be hard to spot. Every company has them, and we've spotted 2 warning signs for Trelleborg (of which 1 shouldn't be ignored!) you should know about.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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