Does Balco Group (STO:BALCO) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
September 10, 2021
OM:BALCO
Source: Shutterstock

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. As with many other companies Balco Group AB (STO:BALCO) makes use of debt. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt A Problem?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Balco Group

What Is Balco Group's Net Debt?

As you can see below, Balco Group had kr208.6m of debt, at June 2021, which is about the same as the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, it also had kr60.4m in cash, and so its net debt is kr148.2m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
OM:BALCO Debt to Equity History September 11th 2021

How Healthy Is Balco Group's Balance Sheet?

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Balco Group had liabilities of kr330.2m falling due within a year, and liabilities of kr287.9m due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of kr60.4m and kr408.9m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total kr148.8m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Since publicly traded Balco Group shares are worth a total of kr2.58b, it seems unlikely that this level of liabilities would be a major threat. But there are sufficient liabilities that we would certainly recommend shareholders continue to monitor the balance sheet, going forward.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Balco Group's net debt is only 1.4 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 23.9 times the size. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. The modesty of its debt load may become crucial for Balco Group if management cannot prevent a repeat of the 42% cut to EBIT over the last year. When it comes to paying off debt, falling earnings are no more useful than sugary sodas are for your health. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Balco Group can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Looking at the most recent three years, Balco Group recorded free cash flow of 46% of its EBIT, which is weaker than we'd expect. That's not great, when it comes to paying down debt.

Our View

Balco Group's EBIT growth rate was a real negative on this analysis, although the other factors we considered were considerably better. In particular, we are dazzled with its interest cover. Looking at all this data makes us feel a little cautious about Balco Group's debt levels. While debt does have its upside in higher potential returns, we think shareholders should definitely consider how debt levels might make the stock more risky. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Case in point: We've spotted 1 warning sign for Balco Group you should be aware of.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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