Triboo (BIT:TB) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet

Published
May 19, 2022
BIT:TB
Source: Shutterstock

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. As with many other companies Triboo S.p.A. (BIT:TB) makes use of debt. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Triboo

What Is Triboo's Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of December 2021, Triboo had €33.6m of debt, up from €19.7m a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, it also had €24.5m in cash, and so its net debt is €9.10m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
BIT:TB Debt to Equity History May 19th 2022

A Look At Triboo's Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Triboo had liabilities of €70.2m falling due within a year, and liabilities of €28.0m due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of €24.5m as well as receivables valued at €35.2m due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling €38.5m more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's €37.8m market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Triboo's net debt is only 1.5 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 27.2 times the size. So we're pretty relaxed about its super-conservative use of debt. Another good sign is that Triboo has been able to increase its EBIT by 25% in twelve months, making it easier to pay down debt. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Triboo's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. During the last three years, Triboo produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 60% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

Triboo's interest cover was a real positive on this analysis, as was its EBIT growth rate. Having said that, its level of total liabilities somewhat sensitizes us to potential future risks to the balance sheet. Considering this range of data points, we think Triboo is in a good position to manage its debt levels. Having said that, the load is sufficiently heavy that we would recommend any shareholders keep a close eye on it. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. Be aware that Triboo is showing 2 warning signs in our investment analysis , you should know about...

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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About BIT:TB

Triboo

Triboo S.p.A. provides e-commerce and digital advertising services worldwide.

The Snowflake is a visual investment summary with the score of each axis being calculated by 6 checks in 5 areas.

Analysis AreaScore (0-6)
Valuation4
Future Growth4
Past Performance3
Financial Health4
Dividends0

Read more about these checks in the individual report sections or in our analysis model.

Good value with reasonable growth potential.