Some Investors May Be Worried About KRBL's (NSE:KRBL) Returns On Capital

By
Simply Wall St
Published
January 24, 2022
NSEI:KRBL
Source: Shutterstock

To find a multi-bagger stock, what are the underlying trends we should look for in a business? Firstly, we'll want to see a proven return on capital employed (ROCE) that is increasing, and secondly, an expanding base of capital employed. Ultimately, this demonstrates that it's a business that is reinvesting profits at increasing rates of return. Although, when we looked at KRBL (NSE:KRBL), it didn't seem to tick all of these boxes.

What is Return On Capital Employed (ROCE)?

For those that aren't sure what ROCE is, it measures the amount of pre-tax profits a company can generate from the capital employed in its business. To calculate this metric for KRBL, this is the formula:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.18 = ₹7.4b ÷ (₹46b - ₹5.0b) (Based on the trailing twelve months to September 2021).

So, KRBL has an ROCE of 18%. In absolute terms, that's a satisfactory return, but compared to the Food industry average of 12% it's much better.

View our latest analysis for KRBL

roce
NSEI:KRBL Return on Capital Employed January 24th 2022

While the past is not representative of the future, it can be helpful to know how a company has performed historically, which is why we have this chart above. If you'd like to look at how KRBL has performed in the past in other metrics, you can view this free graph of past earnings, revenue and cash flow.

What Does the ROCE Trend For KRBL Tell Us?

When we looked at the ROCE trend at KRBL, we didn't gain much confidence. Around five years ago the returns on capital were 25%, but since then they've fallen to 18%. Meanwhile, the business is utilizing more capital but this hasn't moved the needle much in terms of sales in the past 12 months, so this could reflect longer term investments. It's worth keeping an eye on the company's earnings from here on to see if these investments do end up contributing to the bottom line.

On a side note, KRBL has done well to pay down its current liabilities to 11% of total assets. That could partly explain why the ROCE has dropped. What's more, this can reduce some aspects of risk to the business because now the company's suppliers or short-term creditors are funding less of its operations. Since the business is basically funding more of its operations with it's own money, you could argue this has made the business less efficient at generating ROCE.

The Key Takeaway

To conclude, we've found that KRBL is reinvesting in the business, but returns have been falling. And in the last five years, the stock has given away 31% so the market doesn't look too hopeful on these trends strengthening any time soon. All in all, the inherent trends aren't typical of multi-baggers, so if that's what you're after, we think you might have more luck elsewhere.

Like most companies, KRBL does come with some risks, and we've found 1 warning sign that you should be aware of.

If you want to search for solid companies with great earnings, check out this free list of companies with good balance sheets and impressive returns on equity.

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