Is Jindal Worldwide (NSE:JINDWORLD) A Risky Investment?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
January 09, 2022
NSEI:JINDWORLD
Source: Shutterstock

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. Importantly, Jindal Worldwide Limited (NSE:JINDWORLD) does carry debt. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Jindal Worldwide

What Is Jindal Worldwide's Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of September 2021, Jindal Worldwide had ₹5.45b of debt, up from ₹4.12b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, it also had ₹358.0m in cash, and so its net debt is ₹5.10b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NSEI:JINDWORLD Debt to Equity History January 9th 2022

A Look At Jindal Worldwide's Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, Jindal Worldwide had liabilities of ₹5.59b due within 12 months, and liabilities of ₹1.22b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of ₹358.0m as well as receivables valued at ₹3.74b due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by ₹2.71b.

Since publicly traded Jindal Worldwide shares are worth a total of ₹52.9b, it seems unlikely that this level of liabilities would be a major threat. But there are sufficient liabilities that we would certainly recommend shareholders continue to monitor the balance sheet, going forward.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Jindal Worldwide's debt is 2.5 times its EBITDA, and its EBIT cover its interest expense 4.2 times over. Taken together this implies that, while we wouldn't want to see debt levels rise, we think it can handle its current leverage. Notably, Jindal Worldwide's EBIT launched higher than Elon Musk, gaining a whopping 134% on last year. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is Jindal Worldwide's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So if you're keen to discover more about its earnings, it might be worth checking out this graph of its long term earnings trend.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Looking at the most recent three years, Jindal Worldwide recorded free cash flow of 24% of its EBIT, which is weaker than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

Jindal Worldwide's EBIT growth rate suggests it can handle its debt as easily as Cristiano Ronaldo could score a goal against an under 14's goalkeeper. But, on a more sombre note, we are a little concerned by its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow. Looking at all the aforementioned factors together, it strikes us that Jindal Worldwide can handle its debt fairly comfortably. On the plus side, this leverage can boost shareholder returns, but the potential downside is more risk of loss, so it's worth monitoring the balance sheet. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. Be aware that Jindal Worldwide is showing 3 warning signs in our investment analysis , and 2 of those shouldn't be ignored...

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

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