We Think Dixon Technologies (India) (NSE:DIXON) Can Stay On Top Of Its Debt

By
Simply Wall St
Published
March 15, 2022
NSEI:DIXON
Source: Shutterstock

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We note that Dixon Technologies (India) Limited (NSE:DIXON) does have debt on its balance sheet. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. The first step when considering a company's debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for Dixon Technologies (India)

What Is Dixon Technologies (India)'s Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of September 2021 Dixon Technologies (India) had ₹4.16b of debt, an increase on ₹1.75b, over one year. However, it also had ₹2.66b in cash, and so its net debt is ₹1.50b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
NSEI:DIXON Debt to Equity History March 15th 2022

A Look At Dixon Technologies (India)'s Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Dixon Technologies (India) had liabilities of ₹25.5b due within a year, and liabilities of ₹3.22b falling due after that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of ₹2.66b as well as receivables valued at ₹12.3b due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by ₹13.8b.

Given Dixon Technologies (India) has a market capitalization of ₹257.3b, it's hard to believe these liabilities pose much threat. Having said that, it's clear that we should continue to monitor its balance sheet, lest it change for the worse. Carrying virtually no net debt, Dixon Technologies (India) has a very light debt load indeed.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

With net debt sitting at just 0.49 times EBITDA, Dixon Technologies (India) is arguably pretty conservatively geared. And it boasts interest cover of 7.3 times, which is more than adequate. Also good is that Dixon Technologies (India) grew its EBIT at 19% over the last year, further increasing its ability to manage debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Dixon Technologies (India) can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. Over the last three years, Dixon Technologies (India) reported free cash flow worth 10% of its EBIT, which is really quite low. For us, cash conversion that low sparks a little paranoia about is ability to extinguish debt.

Our View

The good news is that Dixon Technologies (India)'s demonstrated ability handle its debt, based on its EBITDA, delights us like a fluffy puppy does a toddler. But the stark truth is that we are concerned by its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow. All these things considered, it appears that Dixon Technologies (India) can comfortably handle its current debt levels. Of course, while this leverage can enhance returns on equity, it does bring more risk, so it's worth keeping an eye on this one. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. To that end, you should be aware of the 2 warning signs we've spotted with Dixon Technologies (India) .

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

Discounted cash flow calculation for every stock

Simply Wall St does a detailed discounted cash flow calculation every 6 hours for every stock on the market, so if you want to find the intrinsic value of any company just search here. It’s FREE.

Make Confident Investment Decisions

Simply Wall St's Editorial Team provides unbiased, factual reporting on global stocks using in-depth fundamental analysis.
Find out more about our editorial guidelines and team.