Here's Why Elco (TLV:ELCO) Has A Meaningful Debt Burden

November 28, 2021
  •  Updated
February 28, 2022
TASE:ELCO
Source: Shutterstock

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. As with many other companies Elco Ltd. (TLV:ELCO) makes use of debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Elco

What Is Elco's Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of June 2021 Elco had ₪4.60b of debt, an increase on ₪3.40b, over one year. On the flip side, it has ₪1.17b in cash leading to net debt of about ₪3.43b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
TASE:ELCO Debt to Equity History November 29th 2021

How Healthy Is Elco's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that Elco had liabilities of ₪6.69b due within a year, and liabilities of ₪6.61b falling due after that. Offsetting this, it had ₪1.17b in cash and ₪3.96b in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities total ₪8.16b more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Given this deficit is actually higher than the company's market capitalization of ₪6.19b, we think shareholders really should watch Elco's debt levels, like a parent watching their child ride a bike for the first time. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Elco has a debt to EBITDA ratio of 3.2, which signals significant debt, but is still pretty reasonable for most types of business. But its EBIT was about 11.7 times its interest expense, implying the company isn't really paying a high cost to maintain that level of debt. Even were the low cost to prove unsustainable, that is a good sign. We note that Elco grew its EBIT by 24% in the last year, and that should make it easier to pay down debt, going forward. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But you can't view debt in total isolation; since Elco will need earnings to service that debt. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Looking at the most recent three years, Elco recorded free cash flow of 39% of its EBIT, which is weaker than we'd expect. That's not great, when it comes to paying down debt.

Our View

While Elco's level of total liabilities has us nervous. For example, its interest cover and EBIT growth rate give us some confidence in its ability to manage its debt. Taking the abovementioned factors together we do think Elco's debt poses some risks to the business. While that debt can boost returns, we think the company has enough leverage now. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For instance, we've identified 2 warning signs for Elco that you should be aware of.

If you're interested in investing in businesses that can grow profits without the burden of debt, then check out this free list of growing businesses that have net cash on the balance sheet.

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About TASE:ELCO

Elco

Elco Ltd. operates in the construction, infrastructure, consumer electronics, telecommunications, entertainment, and real estate sectors in Israel.

The Snowflake is a visual investment summary with the score of each axis being calculated by 6 checks in 5 areas.

Analysis AreaScore (0-6)
Valuation2
Future Growth0
Past Performance5
Financial Health2
Dividends0

Read more about these checks in the individual report sections or in our analysis model.

Solid track record and slightly overvalued.