These 4 Measures Indicate That Hysan Development (HKG:14) Is Using Debt Extensively

By
Simply Wall St
Published
April 28, 2022
SEHK:14
Source: Shutterstock

Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of permanent loss is the risk I worry about... and every practical investor I know worries about.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. As with many other companies Hysan Development Company Limited (HKG:14) makes use of debt. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

Check out our latest analysis for Hysan Development

What Is Hysan Development's Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of December 2021, Hysan Development had HK$26.6b of debt, up from HK$19.2b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. On the flip side, it has HK$6.54b in cash leading to net debt of about HK$20.0b.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SEHK:14 Debt to Equity History April 27th 2022

How Healthy Is Hysan Development's Balance Sheet?

According to the last reported balance sheet, Hysan Development had liabilities of HK$1.94b due within 12 months, and liabilities of HK$27.6b due beyond 12 months. Offsetting this, it had HK$6.54b in cash and HK$926.0m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling HK$22.0b more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of HK$23.7b. This suggests shareholders would be heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Strangely Hysan Development has a sky high EBITDA ratio of 6.4, implying high debt, but a strong interest coverage of 12.2. So either it has access to very cheap long term debt or that interest expense is going to grow! Unfortunately, Hysan Development saw its EBIT slide 2.2% in the last twelve months. If earnings continue on that decline then managing that debt will be difficult like delivering hot soup on a unicycle. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Hysan Development's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. During the last three years, Hysan Development produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 80% of its EBIT, about what we'd expect. This free cash flow puts the company in a good position to pay down debt, when appropriate.

Our View

While Hysan Development's net debt to EBITDA has us nervous. For example, its interest cover and conversion of EBIT to free cash flow give us some confidence in its ability to manage its debt. We think that Hysan Development's debt does make it a bit risky, after considering the aforementioned data points together. That's not necessarily a bad thing, since leverage can boost returns on equity, but it is something to be aware of. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For example - Hysan Development has 1 warning sign we think you should be aware of.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

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