Does Meta Media Holdings (HKG:72) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

By
Simply Wall St
Published
April 21, 2022
SEHK:72
Source: Shutterstock

Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously said that 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. Importantly, Meta Media Holdings Limited (HKG:72) does carry debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more common (but still painful) scenario is that it has to raise new equity capital at a low price, thus permanently diluting shareholders. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Meta Media Holdings

What Is Meta Media Holdings's Net Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of December 2021 Meta Media Holdings had CN¥147.0m of debt, an increase on CN¥103.3m, over one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of CN¥48.0m, its net debt is less, at about CN¥98.9m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
SEHK:72 Debt to Equity History April 21st 2022

A Look At Meta Media Holdings' Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Meta Media Holdings had liabilities of CN¥270.6m falling due within a year, and liabilities of CN¥62.5m due beyond that. On the other hand, it had cash of CN¥48.0m and CN¥204.8m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by CN¥80.3m.

When you consider that this deficiency exceeds the company's CN¥69.7m market capitalization, you might well be inclined to review the balance sheet intently. Hypothetically, extremely heavy dilution would be required if the company were forced to pay down its liabilities by raising capital at the current share price.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

While we wouldn't worry about Meta Media Holdings's net debt to EBITDA ratio of 4.7, we think its super-low interest cover of 1.4 times is a sign of high leverage. In large part that's due to the company's significant depreciation and amortisation charges, which arguably mean its EBITDA is a very generous measure of earnings, and its debt may be more of a burden than it first appears. So shareholders should probably be aware that interest expenses appear to have really impacted the business lately. One redeeming factor for Meta Media Holdings is that it turned last year's EBIT loss into a gain of CN¥8.5m, over the last twelve months. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But you can't view debt in total isolation; since Meta Media Holdings will need earnings to service that debt. So if you're keen to discover more about its earnings, it might be worth checking out this graph of its long term earnings trend.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So it is important to check how much of its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) converts to actual free cash flow. Over the last year, Meta Media Holdings recorded negative free cash flow, in total. Debt is usually more expensive, and almost always more risky in the hands of a company with negative free cash flow. Shareholders ought to hope for an improvement.

Our View

We'd go so far as to say Meta Media Holdings's interest cover was disappointing. Having said that, its ability to grow its EBIT isn't such a worry. We're quite clear that we consider Meta Media Holdings to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet - far from it. We've identified 2 warning signs with Meta Media Holdings (at least 1 which is a bit concerning) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

Of course, if you're the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don't hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

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