The five-year shareholder returns and company earnings persist lower as Bank of Tianjin (HKG:1578) stock falls a further 3.5% in past week

By
Simply Wall St
Published
February 24, 2022
SEHK:1578
Source: Shutterstock

Generally speaking long term investing is the way to go. But that doesn't mean long term investors can avoid big losses. Zooming in on an example, the Bank of Tianjin Co., Ltd. (HKG:1578) share price dropped 63% in the last half decade. That is extremely sub-optimal, to say the least. And it's not just long term holders hurting, because the stock is down 40% in the last year. The falls have accelerated recently, with the share price down 42% in the last three months.

Given the past week has been tough on shareholders, let's investigate the fundamentals and see what we can learn.

See our latest analysis for Bank of Tianjin

While the efficient markets hypothesis continues to be taught by some, it has been proven that markets are over-reactive dynamic systems, and investors are not always rational. One way to examine how market sentiment has changed over time is to look at the interaction between a company's share price and its earnings per share (EPS).

During the five years over which the share price declined, Bank of Tianjin's earnings per share (EPS) dropped by 5.9% each year. Readers should note that the share price has fallen faster than the EPS, at a rate of 18% per year, over the period. This implies that the market was previously too optimistic about the stock. The less favorable sentiment is reflected in its current P/E ratio of 2.19.

You can see how EPS has changed over time in the image below (click on the chart to see the exact values).

earnings-per-share-growth
SEHK:1578 Earnings Per Share Growth February 24th 2022

It might be well worthwhile taking a look at our free report on Bank of Tianjin's earnings, revenue and cash flow.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

We'd be remiss not to mention the difference between Bank of Tianjin's total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price return. Arguably the TSR is a more complete return calculation because it accounts for the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested), along with the hypothetical value of any discounted capital that have been offered to shareholders. Its history of dividend payouts mean that Bank of Tianjin's TSR, which was a 55% drop over the last 5 years, was not as bad as the share price return.

A Different Perspective

We regret to report that Bank of Tianjin shareholders are down 40% for the year. Unfortunately, that's worse than the broader market decline of 17%. However, it could simply be that the share price has been impacted by broader market jitters. It might be worth keeping an eye on the fundamentals, in case there's a good opportunity. Regrettably, last year's performance caps off a bad run, with the shareholders facing a total loss of 9% per year over five years. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. While it is well worth considering the different impacts that market conditions can have on the share price, there are other factors that are even more important. Take risks, for example - Bank of Tianjin has 3 warning signs (and 2 which shouldn't be ignored) we think you should know about.

For those who like to find winning investments this free list of growing companies with recent insider purchasing, could be just the ticket.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on HK exchanges.

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