Returns At Dätwyler Holding (VTX:DAE) Appear To Be Weighed Down

By
Simply Wall St
Published
April 12, 2022
SWX:DAE
Source: Shutterstock

What trends should we look for it we want to identify stocks that can multiply in value over the long term? Amongst other things, we'll want to see two things; firstly, a growing return on capital employed (ROCE) and secondly, an expansion in the company's amount of capital employed. This shows us that it's a compounding machine, able to continually reinvest its earnings back into the business and generate higher returns. Having said that, from a first glance at Dätwyler Holding (VTX:DAE) we aren't jumping out of our chairs at how returns are trending, but let's have a deeper look.

What is Return On Capital Employed (ROCE)?

If you haven't worked with ROCE before, it measures the 'return' (pre-tax profit) a company generates from capital employed in its business. Analysts use this formula to calculate it for Dätwyler Holding:

Return on Capital Employed = Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) ÷ (Total Assets - Current Liabilities)

0.14 = CHF159m ÷ (CHF1.3b - CHF144m) (Based on the trailing twelve months to December 2021).

Therefore, Dätwyler Holding has an ROCE of 14%. That's a relatively normal return on capital, and it's around the 13% generated by the Machinery industry.

See our latest analysis for Dätwyler Holding

roce
SWX:DAE Return on Capital Employed April 12th 2022

In the above chart we have measured Dätwyler Holding's prior ROCE against its prior performance, but the future is arguably more important. If you'd like to see what analysts are forecasting going forward, you should check out our free report for Dätwyler Holding.

What The Trend Of ROCE Can Tell Us

There hasn't been much to report for Dätwyler Holding's returns and its level of capital employed because both metrics have been steady for the past five years. It's not uncommon to see this when looking at a mature and stable business that isn't re-investing its earnings because it has likely passed that phase of the business cycle. So unless we see a substantial change at Dätwyler Holding in terms of ROCE and additional investments being made, we wouldn't hold our breath on it being a multi-bagger. With fewer investment opportunities, it makes sense that Dätwyler Holding has been paying out a decent 44% of its earnings to shareholders. Given the business isn't reinvesting in itself, it makes sense to distribute a portion of earnings among shareholders.

What We Can Learn From Dätwyler Holding's ROCE

We can conclude that in regards to Dätwyler Holding's returns on capital employed and the trends, there isn't much change to report on. Investors must think there's better things to come because the stock has knocked it out of the park, delivering a 102% gain to shareholders who have held over the last five years. But if the trajectory of these underlying trends continue, we think the likelihood of it being a multi-bagger from here isn't high.

On a final note, we've found 1 warning sign for Dätwyler Holding that we think you should be aware of.

While Dätwyler Holding may not currently earn the highest returns, we've compiled a list of companies that currently earn more than 25% return on equity. Check out this free list here.

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