Did You Manage To Avoid PORR’s 32% Share Price Drop?

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It’s easy to match the overall market return by buying an index fund. When you buy individual stocks, you can make higher profits, but you also face the risk of under-performance. Investors in PORR AG (VIE:POS) have tasted that bitter downside in the last year, as the share price dropped 32%. That’s disappointing when you consider the market returned -5.8%. Even if shareholders bought some time ago, they wouldn’t be particularly happy: the stock is down 27% in three years. The falls have accelerated recently, with the share price down 13% in the last three months.

See our latest analysis for PORR

There is no denying that markets are sometimes efficient, but prices do not always reflect underlying business performance. One way to examine how market sentiment has changed over time is to look at the interaction between a company’s share price and its earnings per share (EPS).

Even though the PORR share price is down over the year, its EPS actually improved. It could be that the share price was previously over-hyped. It’s surprising to see the share price fall so much, despite the improved EPS. But we might find some different metrics explain the share price movements better.

We don’t see any weakness in the PORR’s dividend so the steady payout can’t really explain the share price drop. From what we can see, revenue is pretty flat, so that doesn’t really explain the share price drop. Unless, of course, the market was expecting a revenue uptick.

Depicted in the graphic below, you’ll see revenue and earnings over time. If you want more detail, you can click on the chart itself.

WBAG:POS Income Statement Export February 20th 19
WBAG:POS Income Statement Export February 20th 19

We know that PORR has improved its bottom line lately, but what does the future have in store? So we recommend checking out this free report showing consensus forecasts

What About Dividends?

As well as measuring the share price return, investors should also consider the total shareholder return (TSR). The TSR is a return calculation that accounts for the value of cash dividends (assuming that any dividend received was reinvested) and the calculated value of any discounted capital raisings. Arguably, the TSR gives a more comprehensive picture of the return generated by a stock. We note that for PORR the TSR over the last year was -29%, which is better than the share price return mentioned above. The dividends paid by the company have thusly boosted the total shareholder return.

A Different Perspective

We regret to report that PORR shareholders are down 29% for the year (even including dividends). Unfortunately, that’s even worse than the broader market decline of 5.8%. Having said that, its inevitable that some stocks will be oversold in a falling market. The key is to keep your eyes on the fundamental developments. Longer term investors wouldn’t be so upset, since they would have made 6.0%, each year, over five years. It could be that the recent sell-off is an opportunity, so it may be worth checking the fundamental data for signs of a long term growth trend. Importantly, we haven’t analysed PORR’s dividend history. This free visual report on its dividends is a must-read if you’re thinking of buying.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on AT exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.