We Think QIAGEN (NYSE:QGEN) Is Taking Some Risk With Its Debt

Warren Buffett famously said, ‘Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.’ So it seems the smart money knows that debt – which is usually involved in bankruptcies – is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. As with many other companies QIAGEN N.V. (NYSE:QGEN) makes use of debt. But should shareholders be worried about its use of debt?

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. The first step when considering a company’s debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

See our latest analysis for QIAGEN

What Is QIAGEN’s Net Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of September 2019, QIAGEN had US$1.76b of debt, up from US$1.8k a year ago. Click the image for more detail. On the flip side, it has US$799.2m in cash leading to net debt of about US$962.6m.

NYSE:QGEN Historical Debt, January 8th 2020
NYSE:QGEN Historical Debt, January 8th 2020

How Strong Is QIAGEN’s Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that QIAGEN had liabilities of US$630.7m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$2.04b due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had US$799.2m in cash and US$466.7m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$1.41b.

Given QIAGEN has a market capitalization of US$7.54b, it’s hard to believe these liabilities pose much threat. But there are sufficient liabilities that we would certainly recommend shareholders continue to monitor the balance sheet, going forward.

We measure a company’s debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

QIAGEN has net debt worth 2.0 times EBITDA, which isn’t too much, but its interest cover looks a bit on the low side, with EBIT at only 5.0 times the interest expense. While that doesn’t worry us too much, it does suggest the interest payments are somewhat of a burden. Importantly, QIAGEN’s EBIT fell a jaw-dropping 21% in the last twelve months. If that decline continues then paying off debt will be harder than selling foie gras at a vegan convention. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. However, not all investment risk resides within the balance sheet – far from it. For example, we’ve discovered 2 warning signs for QIAGEN (of which 1 is major) which any shareholder or potential investor should be aware of.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. During the last three years, QIAGEN produced sturdy free cash flow equating to 53% of its EBIT, about what we’d expect. This cold hard cash means it can reduce its debt when it wants to.

Our View

QIAGEN’s EBIT growth rate was a real negative on this analysis, although the other factors we considered cast it in a significantly better light. For example, its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow is relatively strong. When we consider all the factors discussed, it seems to us that QIAGEN is taking some risks with its use of debt. While that debt can boost returns, we think the company has enough leverage now. In light of our reservations about the company’s balance sheet, it seems sensible to check if insiders have been selling shares recently.

If, after all that, you’re more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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