If You Had Bought Nordic Mining (OB:NOM) Stock Five Years Ago, You’d Be Sitting On A 57% Loss, Today

Nordic Mining ASA (OB:NOM) shareholders should be happy to see the share price up 13% in the last quarter. But that doesn’t change the fact that the returns over the last half decade have been disappointing. In fact, the share price has declined rather badly, down some 57% in that time. So we’re not so sure if the recent bounce should be celebrated. We’d err towards caution given the long term under-performance.

Check out our latest analysis for Nordic Mining

Nordic Mining didn’t have any revenue in the last year, so it’s fair to say it doesn’t yet have a proven product (or at least not one people are paying for). You have to wonder why venture capitalists aren’t funding it. So it seems shareholders are too busy dreaming about the progress to come than dwelling on the current (lack of) revenue. It seems likely some shareholders believe that Nordic Mining will find or develop a valuable new mine before too long.

As a general rule, if a company doesn’t have much revenue, and it loses money, then it is a high risk investment. There is almost always a chance they will need to raise more capital, and their progress – and share price – will dictate how dilutive that is to current holders. While some such companies do very well over the long term, others become hyped up by promoters before eventually falling back down to earth, and going bankrupt (or being recapitalized). It certainly is a dangerous place to invest, as Nordic Mining investors might realise.

Nordic Mining had net cash of just øre41m when it last reported (December 2018). So if it has not already moved to replenish reserves, we think the near-term chances of a capital raising event are pretty high. With that in mind, you can understand why the share price dropped 16% per year, over 5 years. You can see in the image below, how Nordic Mining’s cash and debt levels have changed over time (click to see the values).

OB:NOM Historical Debt, March 13th 2019
OB:NOM Historical Debt, March 13th 2019

It can be extremely risky to invest in a company that doesn’t even have revenue. There’s no way to know its value easily. What if insiders are ditching the stock hand over fist? It would bother me, that’s for sure. It costs nothing but a moment of your time to see if we are picking up on any insider selling.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

We’ve already covered Nordic Mining’s share price action, but we should also mention its total shareholder return (TSR). The TSR attempts to capture the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested) and any discounted capital raisings offered to shareholders. Nordic Mining hasn’t been paying dividends, but its TSR of -53% exceeds its share price return of -57%, implying it has raised capital at a discount, which is deemed to provide value to shareholders.

A Different Perspective

Nordic Mining shareholders are down 28% for the year, but the market itself is up 7.5%. However, keep in mind that even the best stocks will sometimes underperform the market over a twelve month period. Regrettably, last year’s performance caps off a bad run, with the shareholders facing a total loss of 14% per year over five years. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. Before spending more time on Nordic Mining it might be wise to click here to see if insiders have been buying or selling shares.

If you would prefer to check out another company — one with potentially superior financials — then do not miss this free list of companies that have proven they can grow earnings.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on NO exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.