Is Howard Hughes (NYSE:HHC) Using Too Much Debt?

The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway’s Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says ‘The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital. It’s only natural to consider a company’s balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We can see that The Howard Hughes Corporation (NYSE:HHC) does use debt in its business. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt Dangerous?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can’t easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of ‘creative destruction’ where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. The first step when considering a company’s debt levels is to consider its cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Howard Hughes

What Is Howard Hughes’s Net Debt?

As you can see below, at the end of June 2019, Howard Hughes had US$3.46b of debt, up from US$3.14b a year ago. Click the image for more detail. However, it also had US$650.7m in cash, and so its net debt is US$2.81b.

NYSE:HHC Historical Debt, October 22nd 2019
NYSE:HHC Historical Debt, October 22nd 2019

A Look At Howard Hughes’s Liabilities

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Howard Hughes had liabilities of US$697.8m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$3.66b due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had US$650.7m in cash and US$379.7m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$3.33b.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of US$5.47b. This suggests shareholders would heavily diluted if the company needed to shore up its balance sheet in a hurry.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Howard Hughes shareholders face the double whammy of a high net debt to EBITDA ratio (8.2), and fairly weak interest coverage, since EBIT is just 2.3 times the interest expense. The debt burden here is substantial. The silver lining is that Howard Hughes grew its EBIT by 129% last year, which nourishing like the idealism of youth. If that earnings trend continues it will make its debt load much more manageable in the future. There’s no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately the future profitability of the business will decide if Howard Hughes can strengthen its balance sheet over time. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don’t cut it. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the last three years, Howard Hughes recorded free cash flow worth a fulsome 91% of its EBIT, which is stronger than we’d usually expect. That positions it well to pay down debt if desirable to do so.

Our View

Based on what we’ve seen Howard Hughes is not finding it easy net debt to EBITDA, but the other factors we considered give us cause to be optimistic. In particular, we are dazzled with its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow. Considering this range of data points, we think Howard Hughes is in a good position to manage its debt levels. But a word of caution: we think debt levels are high enough to justify ongoing monitoring. Of course, we wouldn’t say no to the extra confidence that we’d gain if we knew that Howard Hughes insiders have been buying shares: if you’re on the same wavelength, you can find out if insiders are buying by clicking this link.

Of course, if you’re the type of investor who prefers buying stocks without the burden of debt, then don’t hesitate to discover our exclusive list of net cash growth stocks, today.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.