Those Who Purchased VSE (NASDAQ:VSEC) Shares A Year Ago Have A 44% Loss To Show For It

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Passive investing in an index fund is a good way to ensure your own returns roughly match the overall market. When you buy individual stocks, you can make higher profits, but you also face the risk of under-performance. For example, the VSE Corporation (NASDAQ:VSEC) share price is down 44% in the last year. That falls noticeably short of the market return of around 3.5%. Longer term shareholders haven’t suffered as badly, since the stock is down a comparatively less painful 14% in three years. Even worse, it’s down 15% in about a month, which isn’t fun at all. This could be related to the recent financial results – you can catch up on the most recent data by reading our company report.

View our latest analysis for VSE

While the efficient markets hypothesis continues to be taught by some, it has been proven that markets are over-reactive dynamic systems, and investors are not always rational. One flawed but reasonable way to assess how sentiment around a company has changed is to compare the earnings per share (EPS) with the share price.

Unhappily, VSE had to report a 11% decline in EPS over the last year. The share price decline of 44% is actually more than the EPS drop. Unsurprisingly, given the lack of EPS growth, the market seems to be more cautious about the stock. The less favorable sentiment is reflected in its current P/E ratio of 8.71.

The graphic below depicts how EPS has changed over time (unveil the exact values by clicking on the image).

NasdaqGS:VSEC Past and Future Earnings, May 14th 2019
NasdaqGS:VSEC Past and Future Earnings, May 14th 2019

It might be well worthwhile taking a look at our free report on VSE’s earnings, revenue and cash flow.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

We’ve already covered VSE’s share price action, but we should also mention its total shareholder return (TSR). The TSR attempts to capture the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested) as well as any spin-offs or discounted capital raisings offered to shareholders. Dividends have been really beneficial for VSE shareholders, and that cash payout explains why its total shareholder loss of 44%, over the last year, isn’t as bad as the share price return.

A Different Perspective

Investors in VSE had a tough year, with a total loss of 44% (including dividends), against a market gain of about 3.5%. However, keep in mind that even the best stocks will sometimes underperform the market over a twelve month period. Unfortunately, last year’s performance may indicate unresolved challenges, given that it was worse than the annualised loss of 1.7% over the last half decade. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. If you would like to research VSE in more detail then you might want to take a look at whether insiders have been buying or selling shares in the company.

We will like VSE better if we see some big insider buys. While we wait, check out this free list of growing companies with considerable, recent, insider buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.